This is the third part of a three-part Valentine’s Day menu. Get the first course here and the second course here!

By Robert Ramsey — Director of Advanced Culinary Center

Round out your vegetarian Valentine’s Day with this savory main course. The presentation is beautiful and it’s actually a lot simpler than it looks to create. Plus, the rich buttery crust and truffle-infused mushroom duxelles scream decadence and luxury. If any of the mushrooms are unavailable, you can substitute any type of fresh mushrooms that are available.

mushroom tart

Truffle Mushroom Tart
Servings: Makes about two servings

For duxelles (filling)

Ingredients:

8 ounces button mushrooms
4 ounces shiitake mushrooms
4 ounces oyster mushrooms
1 large portobello cap
1/2 yellow onion
2 sprigs fresh thyme
1 sprig fresh rosemary
4 ounces white wine
1 ounce truffle oil
2 ounces + 1 ounce butter
Salt and pepper to taste

Preparation:

  • Clean mushrooms and remove stems. Process mushrooms in food processor, pulsing until mushrooms are finely minced, but not puréed into a paste. Reserve.
  • Finely mince the onion, rosemary leaves and thyme leaves. Melt the butter in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the mushrooms and sauté until they cook down to about half the original volume. They should have a very dark color. Add the onion, thyme and rosemary and continue to sauté until onions are soft, about five minutes.
  • Next, add the white wine and continue to cook over medium heat. Allow the wine to reduce and absorb into the mushrooms, about five more minutes.
  • Remove the mixture from the heat, stir in the butter and truffle oil, and season with salt and pepper. Chill and reserve.

mushroom tart crust

mushroom tart filling

mushroom tart egg wash

For the crust

Ingredients:

2 sheets puff pastry
1 egg
Small amount of flour for dusting work surface.

Preparation:

  • Preheat oven to 425° F.
  • Remove puff pastry from the freezer and allow it to warm up slightly at room temperature on a lightly floured work surface. It should remain firm, but slightly pliable, about five minutes.
  • Using the bottom of an 8-inch tart pan, or just an 8-inch plate as a guide, cut two matching circles from the puff pastry. Place one circle on a baking sheet and the other back in the freezer.
  • Next, pile the duxelles filling into a mound in the center of the puff pastry, leaving a one-inch ring around the edges. Transfer back to the freezer for five to ten minutes to re-firm the puff pastry.
  • While the crust is in the freezer, make your egg wash by beating together one whole egg with one ounce of cold water.
  • Remove both the top and bottom crust from the freezer and return to your work station. Before proceeding with the tart assembly, cut a small hole directly in the center of the top crust (the one with no mushrooms on it), about the size of a pencil. Brush the bottom crust (the one with the duxelles filling on it) with the egg wash, covering just the portion of crust not covered by duxelles. Place the now pliable top crust on and press the two sheets of puff pastry together. Be sure to seal the seams tightly — you can really pinch the edges together.
  • At this point you’re ready to decorate the crust. First, using the backside of a paring knife blade, pull the edge of the dough inward at one-inch intervals to make scalloped edges (see photo). Once you have scalloped all edges of the tart, cut curved lines into the tart top with the tip of the paring knife. The lines should connect from the center vent hole to each of the scallops on the edge, making a graceful curve as they go (see photo). The cuts should not go more than halfway through the puff pastry dough.

mushroom tart

mushroom tart

mushroom tart

To finish

  • Brush the entire tart carefully with the remaining egg wash. Make sure it is evenly coated and that there is not excessive egg wash pooling anywhere on the tart or it will burn.
  • Place the tart into preheated oven. The tart will need to bake for about 20 minutes. It should be rotated about halfway through the cooking to ensure even browning.
  • Once the tart is a dark, golden brown, puffed up and shiny, it is ready. Remove from the oven and allow it to sit for at least 30 minutes before cutting.
  • This dish is beautiful served with a simple green salad, dressed with just a little oil and vinegar.

mushroom_8

Want to study the culinary arts with Chef Robert? Click here for more information on ICE’s career programs. 

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What drives you? How do you reach people? When you make your mark on the world, what will it look like? What’s your culinary voice? With the 2017 #CulinaryVoice Scholarship Challenge in full swing, we turned to the judges, ICE’s industry-leading chefs and instructors, and posed them that same question. Here’s a look at their answers.

Culinary Voice ICE Instructors

(Top to bottom, left to right)

Tom Kombiz-Voss, Dean of Hospitality Management: “Inspiring and training each student to reach his or her highest potential in the hospitality industry.”

James Briscione, Director of Culinary Development: “Creative … and never satisfied.”

Sabrina Sexton, Culinary Arts Program Director: “Inspiring future chefs to better their community.”

Kate Edwards, Restaurant & Culinary Management instructor: “Hello! … And every little thing that matters.”

Michael Laiskonis, Creative Director: “Innovation and inspiration.”

David Waltuck, Director of Culinary Affairs: “Sharing 4+ decades of knowledge and experience.”

Anthony Caporale, Director of Beverage Studies: “The art of the drink.”

Steve Zagor, Dean of Culinary Management: “Mentoring, coaching and educating the next generation of the industry.”

Entries and voting are open! Click here to enter or vote for your favorite video. 

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This is the second part of a three-part Valentine’s Day menu. Get the first dish here

By Robert Ramsey — Director of Advanced Culinary Center

Figs and honey have long been considered aphrodisiacs by cultures the world over, so we’ll use both in this sweet and savory combination. Figs were supposedly the favorite fruit of Cleopatra and honey was prescribed by Hippocrates to boost libido. In short, this is the perfect Valentine’s Day appetizer, regardless of whether you stick to a vegetarian diet or not.

Fig Toasts with Ricotta

Fig and Ricotta Toast
Servings: Makes about two servings

Ingredients:

1 pint fresh figs
1 small shallot
2 ounces wildflower honey
3 ounces extra virgin olive oil
1 cup fresh ricotta cheese
1 teaspoon sweet paprika
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 large handful arugula
1 tablespoon champagne vinegar (or white wine vinegar)
Salt to taste
4 slices of crusty, country style bread

Fig Toast with Ricotta

Preparation:

  • Start by slicing your figs in half. Then mince the shallot. Reserve in a mixing bowl together.
  • In a separate bowl, whisk together ricotta, half the olive oil, the black pepper and a pinch of salt. Whisk this mixture vigorously until smooth. Reserve.
  • Next, separately whisk together the honey, remaining olive oil, vinegar, paprika and another small pinch of salt to form the dressing.
  • Toast the sliced bread until lightly crisp.
  • Add the arugula to the bowl with the figs and shallots, and gently mix with the dressing. Be careful not to overdress, you may not need it all.
  • To assemble, spread a quarter of the ricotta mixture on each slice of toast. Pile the fig mixture on top. Drizzle with a little extra honey dressing if desired.

Ready to get into the kitchen with Chef Robert? Click here for more information on ICE’s culinary arts program. 

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Whether you’re rooting for the Patriots or the Falcons, there’s at least one thing we can all agree on: Super Bowl Sunday is the perfect day for watching football eating chicken wings. To help you score a tastier-than-ever Super Bowl spread, Chef James Briscione is sharing his secret to the ultimate make-at-home chicken wings. With a healthy dose of brining and a simple, delicious sauce, these wings will make even your non-enthusiast friends excited about football.

By James Briscione — Director of Culinary Development

Brined Chicken Wings

Ingredients:

For the wings 

3 cups water
¼ cup sugar
¼ cup + 1 tablespoon kosher salt
¼ cup Frank’s Red Hot or Tabasco Pepper Sauce
4 cloves garlic
4 branches fresh thyme or 1 teaspoon dry thyme
2 lbs chicken wings

For the sauce

¼ cup Frank’s Red Hot or Tabasco Pepper Sauce
2 ounces butter, cut in to small pieces

Brined Chicken Wings

Preparation: 

  1. Combine the water, sugar and salt in bowl and whisk until dissolved. Add the hot sauce, garlic, thyme and chicken wings. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and place in the refrigerator overnight or up to 48 hours.
  2. Transfer the chicken wings and brine to a medium saucepot. If the wings are not completely covered, add water to the pot to cover. Over high heat, bring the mixture to a boil, then turn off the heat and allow wings to cool in the liquid for 15 minutes. Remove the wings from the liquid and store in the refrigerator, covered, until ready to serve.
  3. To serve, remove the wings from the refrigerator and set aside at room temperature while you prepare the oil and sauce. Fill a large saucepan with canola or vegetable oil (about ¾ inch deep) and heat oil over medium heat.
  4. While oil is heating, pour the hot sauce into a small saucepot and place over high heat. Add the butter and whisk until melted and fully incorporated. Transfer the mixture to a large mixing bowl or a second large saucepan and hold next to the stove.
  5. Add flour to a large mixing bowl or baking pan and season well with salt and pepper. Roll the chicken wings in the flour to coat completely.
  6. To test if the oil is hot enough, sprinkle a pinch of flour into the pan; if the oil sizzles immediately, it’s ready to fry. Remove the wings from the flour one-by-one and pat off any of the excess flour. Carefully place the chicken wings in the hot oil — it should come about halfway up the side of the wing.
  7. Let the wings cook until golden brown, about 1-2 minutes, then turn with a pair of tongs and brown again on the second side. Transfer the browned wings to the bowl of hot sauce. Repeat with the remaining wings, keeping the pan of oil full of wings but trying not to let them touch one another (or they could stick together and not cook properly). Every time you remove one wing, replace it with another until the wings have been browned.
  8. Toss wings in the sauce bowl to coat and serve immediately.

Note: Leave the oil to cool on top of the stove. When cooled, pour the oil into a bottle with a screw-on lid and discard. 

This recipe originally appeared on The Couples Kitchen.

Want to practice your culinary arts skills with Chef James? Get more information on ICE’s career programs here.

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If recipes are like the Oscars, oils generally fall into the category of Best Supporting Actor — but not anymore. In a new video from the Institute of Culinary Education and Direct Eats, ICE Chef Robert Ramsey shares three recipes that highlight the unique flavors of three tasty cooking oils — Smoked Olive Oil Carbonara with homemade Pasta All’ Uovo; Roasted Beets with Bitter Greens, Walnut Oil Emulsion, Blue Cheese and Walnut Oil Powder; and Tigernut Oil Ice Cream With Roasted Apples, Rolled Oat Crumble and Honey Tigernut Oil. Watch the video, then scroll down to get the recipes to let those oils shine.

Smoked Olive Oil Carbonara
Servings: Makes about 4 servings

Ingredients:

1 recipe, pasta all’ uovo (recipe below)
10 tablespoons Holy Smokes Smoked Olive Oil
8 ounces thinly sliced guanciale, chopped (If unavailable, bacon or pancetta will work well)
4 egg yolks
6 ounces grated pecorino cheese
2 sprigs fresh oregano or marjoram, leaves picked from the stems
1 tablespoon freshly ground, coarse black pepper
Salt to taste

Preparation:

  1. Make fresh pasta first. It is best to store it in the freezer or cook it right away.
  2. Fill a large pot with water and season aggressively with salt. Begin heating the water while working on the rest of the recipe.
  3. In a large sauté pan over medium heat, render the guanciale (lightly brown it while melting the fat) until it becomes crisp.
  4. Add 6 tablespoons of the olive oil, the cracked black pepper and oregano leaves and reduce heat to low. Allow the flavors to infuse on low heat for about 5 minutes.
  5. While the sauce is cooking and when water reaches a rolling boil, drop pasta into your water. Cook pasta for about 3 minutes, then drain, reserving the pasta water.
  6. Add the pasta to the sauté pan with guanciale, pepper, oil and oregano. Add the egg yolks and 2-3 tablespoons of the pasta water and half of the cheese (as the pasta water contains starch, it will make the sauce creamy). Stir quickly and constantly to incorporate, about 1 minute. Do not allow this to sit on the heat without stirring or the eggs will scramble.
  7. Divide the pasta between four bowls, spooning any leftover sauce over the top. Drizzle the remaining olive oil on top and finish with the remaining cheese.

Pasta all’ Uovo (Fresh Egg Pasta)
Servings: makes about 4 servings

Ingredients:

11 ounces of all-purpose flour
3 large eggs, at room temperature
1 teaspoon salt

Preparation:

  1. Place the flour on your work surface and make a well in the center.
  2. Break the eggs into the well and add the salt. With a fork, begin to gently beat the eggs in a circular motion, incorporating approximately ½ of the flour.
  3. Using a bench scraper, bring the entire mixture together.
  4. Knead the dough with your hands for 3 to 4 minutes. At this stage, the dough should be soft and pliable. If bits of dried dough form (which is normal), don’t incorporate them into the dough — brush them off of your work surface.
  5. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and let it rest for 20 minutes.
  6. Cut the dough into four pieces and recover with the plastic wrap to prevent a skin from forming.
  7. Remove one piece of the dough at a time from the plastic wrap and knead through the rollers of a pasta machine set at the widest setting. Fold the dough like a business letter to form three layers, pressing out all of the air. Turn the open end of the dough to the right (like a book) and repeat the rolling process. Continue the folding and rolling process five times on this setting.
  8. Repeat the folding and rolling process for the three remaining pieces of dough.
  9. Roll a piece of the previously kneaded dough through the pasta machine, reducing the setting with each roll until reaching the narrowest setting. Do not fold the dough between each setting.
  10. Cut the spaghetti using a chitarra (wire pasta cutter) or kitchen aide attachment
  11. Cook the pasta in boiling, salted water until desired doneness, about 3 minutes. Drain well. Reserve for the carbonara.

 

Roasted Beets with Bitter Greens, Walnut Oil Emulsion, Blue Cheese and Walnut Oil Powder
Servings: Makes about 4 servings

Ingredients:

8-10 baby red beets, washed, unpeeled
8-10 baby gold beets, washed, unpeeled
8-10 baby candy stripe beets, washed, unpeeled
4 tablespoons canola oil
1 sprig thyme
1 sprig rosemary
1 small red onion, peeled and thinly sliced
1 head frisée, washed, dark green leaves removed, trimmed
1 bunch arugula (about 8 ounces) washed
4 ounces creamy blue cheese (such as gorgonzola), crumbled
1 cup walnuts, toasted, chopped
4 tablespoons sherry vinegar
2 tablespoons honey
10 tablespoons + 4 tablespoons walnut oil
2 ounces tapioca maltodextrin (sometimes sold as N-Zorbit) — note: this must be measured by weight!
Salt and pepper to taste

Preparation:

For the beets: 

  1. Preheat oven to 300° F.
  2. In a mixing bowl combine beets, salt and pepper, canola oil, rosemary and thyme and toss to evenly coat. Transfer to a small baking dish and cover tightly with foil. Roast beets until very tender, 20-45 minutes depending on the size of the beets. You can check for doneness by inserting the tip of a paring knife into the largest beet. If there is little-to-no resistance, the beets are ready.
  3. Allow beets to cool just enough that you can handle them. Discard the herbs. Using a paper towel, rub the skins to remove them from beets. Slice each beet in half (or quarters if they are larger). Reserve.

For the walnut oil emulsion:

  1. In the pitcher of a blender, combine ½ cup toasted walnuts, sherry vinegar, 2 tablespoons cold water, honey and a pinch of salt. Purée until smooth.
  2. With the blender running, slowly stream in the 10 tablespoons of walnut oil, forming a thick, emulsified sauce. Reserve.

For the walnut oil powder:

  1. In a medium mixing bowl, combine 4 tablespoons walnut oil with 2 ounces tapioca maltodextrin. Mix until a crumbly, slightly moist powder forms.
  2. Transfer to a mesh sieve and tap the powder through over a sheet pan. This will break up the clumps. Reserve.

Note: Tapioca Maltodextrin is a natural extract used to turn liquid oils into powders because each grain has the ability to hold a huge amount of fat. It can be found on the internet and at some specialty stores. If unavailable, skip this step and serve with finely chopped walnuts instead.

To assemble:

  1. Toss the roasted beets, remaining walnuts, greens and half the emulsion together in a mixing bowl. Season with salt and pepper. Reserve.
  2. Spoon a little of the remaining emulsion on each of four plates, making a small pool in the center.
  3. Layer the beet mixture on top of the emulsion.
  4. Divide the blue cheese crumbles evenly and sprinkle over each plate.
  5. Top with a dusting of walnut oil powder. You can sprinkle it directly through the sieve if desired.

 

Tigernut Oil Ice Cream With Roasted Apples, Rolled Oat Crumble and Honey Tigernut Oil Drizzle
Servings: makes 4-6 servings

For the tigernut oil ice cream:
Servings: makes about 3 ½ cups

Ingredients:

1 ¾ cups whole milk
¼ cup heavy cream
¼ teaspoon kosher salt
½ cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar
4 large egg yolks
1/3 cup tigernut oil

Preparation:

  1. Bring milk, cream, salt and ½ cup sugar just to a simmer in a medium saucepan, stirring to dissolve sugar; remove from heat.
  2. Whisk egg yolks and the other 2 tablespoons of sugar in a medium bowl until pale, about two minutes. Gradually whisk ½ cup hot milk mixture into yolks. Whisk yolk mixture back into remaining milk mixture in saucepan. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until thick enough to coat the back of a wooden spoon, about 2–3 minutes.
  3. Strain custard through a fine-mesh sieve into a medium bowl set in a large bowl of ice water; whisk in oil. Let cool, stirring occasionally. Process custard in an ice cream maker according to manufacturer’s instructions.
  4. Transfer ice cream to an airtight container, cover and freeze until firm, at least 4 hours.

For the roasted apples:

Ingredients:

3 tart apples (like Granny Smith), peeled, sliced into wedges
3 sweet apples (like Honeycrisp), peeled, sliced into wedges
Juice of half of 1 lemon
¼ cup granulated sugar
½ teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon salt

Preparation:

  1. Preheat oven to 350° F.
  2. Combine all ingredients in a large mixing bowl and toss to coat.
  3. Transfer to a oven safe dish and roast apples in a single layer until tender and browned, but not falling apart. Reserve.

For the rolled oat crumble

Ingredients:

¾ cups old-fashioned rolled oats
¾ cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 cup light brown sugar
¾ cup cold butter

Preparation:

  1. Preheat oven to 325° F.
  2. Mix brown sugar, oats, flour and cinnamon in a separate bowl. Use a pastry cutter or two forks to mash cold butter into the oats mixture until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs.
  3. Spread mixture on sheet pan lined with parchment. Pat the topping gently to even out and bake until crispy and lightly browned. Remove from oven and reserve.

For the honey tigernut oil drizzle:

Ingredients:

8 tablespoons honey
8 tablespoons tigernut oil
½ vanilla bean, split open, seeds scraped

Preparation:

  1. In a mixing bowl, whisk oil, honey and vanilla bean seeds together until evenly mixed and thick.

To assemble:

  1. Layer the warm apples directly on a plate or wide bowl. Sprinkle the crumble over top, breaking up any very large pieces as you go. Top with one scoop of ice cream. Spoon the honey tigernut drizzle over the top and serve.

Want to study culinary arts with Chef Robert? Click here for more information on ICE’s career programs. 

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This Valentine’s Day, skip the reservations race and treat your special someone to a decadent homemade meal. To help you conquer the most important step — menu planning — ICE Chef Robert Ramsey came up with the perfect, balanced, veggie-forward three-course meal, beginning with a winter citrus salad, followed by fig and ricotta toasts and ending with a rich truffle mushroom tart. The only things missing are a bottle of wine and a good playlist.

By Robert Ramsey — Chef Instructor, School of Culinary Arts

People often forget that citrus comes into season in the winter. This time of year, the fruit is at its sweetest, juiciest and most alluring…perfect for Valentine’s Day. If you can’t find every variety used in this recipe, use any mix of citrus fruit you desire. Here, we top it with a sprinkling of pomegranate seeds, also a winter crop. According to legend, Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love, is credited with planting the first pomegranate tree.

Veg_Valentine_3

Winter Citrus Salad
Servings: Makes about two servings

Ingredients:

1 navel orange
1 blood orange
1 ruby red grapefruit
2 tangerines
½ medium red onion
½ fennel bulb
½ bunch fresh mint
Seeds of 1 pomegranate
4 tablespoons good quality extra virgin olive oil
1-2 teaspoons crushed pink peppercorns
Maldon salt for finishing

Veg_Valentine_1

Preparation:

  • Peel all citrus using a paring knife. Make sure all white pith is removed.
  • Cut citrus into various shapes — segments, wedges and slices add visual interest. Toss together in a mixing bowl and reserve at room temperature.
  • Slice red onion and fennel very thinly. I like to use a Japanese mandolin to ensure even cuts. Add the fennel and onion to the citrus mixture. Sprinkle a good pinch of Maldon salt (or any large flake salt) and the pink peppercorns. Toss well and allow salad to sit for 15-20 minutes.
  • While salad is sitting, rough chop or tear the mint, leaves only.
  • Finish the salad by tossing the mint, olive oil, pomegranate seeds and citrus mixture together.
  • Transfer to two plates, finish with a sprinkle of Maldon salt and a drizzle of olive oil, if desired.

Interested in studying culinary arts with Chef Robert? Click here for more information on ICE’s career programs. 

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