By Jeff Yoskowitz—Chef Instructor, School of Pastry & Baking Arts

 

Every year since I can remember, my extended family has journeyed to my cousin’s house in Irvington, New York for a Chanukah celebration. My father, when he was alive, would enter their home, immediately tie on an apron, grab a bowl of latke mix and start frying potato latkes by the hundreds. It would take him hours, but he loved every minute of it.

jelly doughnuts

It was a special time for me, and I always ate too much of the iconic fried foods prepared for the celebration. When desserts were served, there were always fried doughnuts—usually jelly-filled—that I ate, regardless of how full I was. Over the years, it came as no surprise that I took charge of dessert, making jelly-filled doughnuts of all kinds. One of my favorite variations to make is this recipe, where the doughnuts are filled with the jelly before you fry them. There really is no comparison to eating a fresh, warm doughnut infused with a warm fruit preserve.

 

Read on for Chef Jeff's ultimate sufganiyot (Israeli jelly doughnut) recipe.

15. December 2017 · Categories: Video

 

At ICE, we make it our mission to help students find their culinary voice — that creative drive within each of us that determines how we express ourselves through food. Whether it’s a career training program, a recreational course in pie crusts or a special event featuring handmade pasta, we’ll give you the tools to hone your culinary creativity. Join us as we ask some of today’s leading food industry pros to share their culinary voice.

Donatella Arpaia

Donatella Arpaia — restaurateur, cookbook author and Iron Chef judge — made a name for herself through her award-winning restaurants that combined classic, delicious cuisine with modern surroundings. The talented restaurateur, who spent a brief stint as a corporate attorney before pursuing her passion for hospitality, helped earn her restaurants serious food world acclaim, including a James Beard Award nomination for Best New Restaurant. Asked to describe her culinary voice, Donatella confided that it’s very much a reflection of her own personal style — something that’s helped to bring her professional success.

 

Watch the video to see what that winning combination means for this talented hospitality expert.

14. December 2017 · Categories: Alumni

 

Gail Simmons knows great food. The Top Chef judge (for 15 seasons and counting!) and ICE Culinary Arts graduate has a taste for adventurous eating and the passport mileage to prove it. But what does she cook when she’s in her own kitchen? Which recipes does Gail rely on again and again when she’s on her home turf? Readers will discover Gail’s time-tested and totally doable favorites in her new cookbook, Bringing it Home: Favorite Recipes from a Life of Adventurous Eating. We couldn’t think of a better gift to give the food lover in your life. But still, we were curious — what is the Toronto-native gifting the people on her list? As it turns out, food isn’t the only thing Gail knows well — check out her great gift recommendations.

Gail Simmons

Keep reading to get Gail Simmons’ recommendations for everyone on your list.

 

It's hard to believe that it's already time to start planning events for 2018. If your New Year's resolution is to be a better cook, baker or cocktail maker, you and your guests will love learning new skills at ICE. ICE’s Special Events department hosts over 400 culinary events every year, and we turn each event or celebration into a fun, gourmet experience.

figs in a blanket

To give you a taste of what's in store when you host an event at ICE, Philipp Hering, ICE's Special Events lead chef, is sharing one of our most popular, vegetarian-friendly bites: figs in a blanket with whipped goat cheese mousse - all of the tender, flaky, buttery goodness, with a feel-good substitution of juicy figs. Who says a healthy 2018 can't be tasty, too?!

 

Keep reading to get the recipe for this addictive appy. 

08. December 2017 · Categories: Video

 

At ICE, we make it our mission to help students find their culinary voice — that creative drive within each of us that determines how we express ourselves through food. Whether it’s a career training program, a recreational course in pie crusts or a special event featuring handmade pasta, we’ll give you the tools to hone your culinary creativity. Join us as we ask some of today’s leading food industry pros to share their culinary voice.

 

Like choosing a favorite child, it's not easy to choose a favorite restaurant. Still, when taken to task, top chefs consistently pick Marea, Chef Michael White’s Michelin-starred mecca for Italian seafood that sits pretty on Central Park South. Bobby Flay describes it as “probably my favorite restaurant in the city — from perfect crudo to pasta with sea urchin, Michael White brings his A-game always.” Even the James Beard Foundation chose Marea as the Best New Restaurant in 2010. Other restaurants from Chef White’s Altamarea Group, like Ai Fiori, are time-tested New Yorker favorites, too.

Chef Michael White

So what does the king of elegant seafood and craveable carbs think about when he’s in the kitchen? What is his culinary voice? It begins with something he likes to call “taste memory.” Watch the video and discover what that means for Chef Michael White.

 

By Michael Laiskonis — Creative Director

 

If I were to ask you to describe the physical characteristics of chocolate, chances are you might think of a dark, shiny and brittle bar that slowly melts in the mouth. Perhaps you might immediately associate its rich flavor baked into a brownie or concealed within a creamy bonbon. You wouldn’t be wrong, of course, as chocolate has found its way into countless applications — a sweet shape shifter that pairs perfectly with our favorite flavors. That hasn’t always been the case. For much of its history, chocolate wasn’t something we would eat out of hand or find in a dessert recipe.

Hot Chocolate

Read on to learn the history of this beloved beverage — plus get Michael's recipe!

 

By James Briscione, Director of Culinary Research

 

Gifts are the best and worst part about the holiday season. Receiving = the best. Finding that perfect something-they-don’t-already-have gift for the special person on your list = the worst. For the foodie on your shopping list, we’re here to make your gift search a painless victory. Though stores and online catalogs are filled with hundreds of “must-have” kitchen gadgets, only some of them are actually worth it — others not so much. To help you cut through the clutter and find the best of the best, the following is my list of recommended essential kitchen gifts.

sous vide steak

Read on to learn which kitchen gadgets to gift the foodie in your life.

 

At ICE, we make it our mission to help students find their culinary voice — that creative drive within each of us that determines how we express ourselves through food. Whether it’s a career training program, a recreational course in pie crusts or a special event featuring handmade pasta, we’ll give you the tools to hone your culinary creativity. Join us as we ask some of today’s leading food industry pros to share their culinary voice.

 

If you’re trying to figure out where the cool kids in New York are eating or just looking for delicious, DIY home-cooking inspiration, look no further than the Instagram feed of Eden Grinshpan (Culinary Management ’08), aka @edeneats. With a voracious appetite and a contagious sense of humor, the Chopped Canada judge and ICE graduate has a unique culinary voice, inspired in large part by her experience delving into food cultures around the globe.

Eden Grinshpan

Watch as Eden Grinshpan shares her culinary voice.

 

By Sarah Entwistle  — Student, Culinary Arts ‘18

 

Meet Sarah Entwistle, our newest “Life as a Culinary Student” blogger. After graduating from American University with a degree in business, Sarah headed to Salt Lake City to pursue a career in finance. Though she was rising through the ranks as an analyst at Goldman Sachs, after a few years Sarah realized that her passions lay elsewhere — cooking. Sarah returned to the east coast and enrolled in ICE’s Culinary Arts program. In this first blog post, she writes about a unique aspect of Life as a Culinary Student — volunteer opportunities with world-renowned chefs.

The excitement was palpable as five other culinary students and I waited for our assignments in the kitchen. Most of us had already volunteered at an ICE event, but we knew the stakes were higher with Chef Alex Atala, considered by many the best chef in South America. Chef Atala was in New York City to cook for a benefit dinner on behalf of the MAD/Yale collaboration at ICE. The goal of this collaboration is to bring together established and emerging chefs and scholars to improve our modern food systems. As Chef Atala is a huge proponent of sustainable cooking practices, sourcing products from local vendors and taking steps to reduce food waste, this was an organic partnership that celebrated the union of social consciousness and delicious food.

 

Keep reading about Sarah's first brush with a culinary superstar. 

 

On Sunday, November 18, ICE hosted the James Beard Foundation’s annual Chefs’ Night Out — a prelude to the JBF Awards ceremony in Chicago and a chance for chefs, nominees and presenters to mix and mingle while sampling delicious, inventive food and drink. With the James Beard Foundation also celebrating its 30th anniversary, this year’s Chefs’ Night Out was particularly festive. “ICE and the James Beard Foundation have always had a special bond and shared history,” said ICE President Rick Smilow. “The predecessor to ICE was Peter Kump’s New York Cooking School, which was founded by Peter Kump in 1975. Kump, along with Julia Child and Jacques Pépin, was the founder of the James Beard Foundation and served as its first President.”

ICE Student Volunteers

Read on to check out all the photos of this exciting evening at ICE.