Who says you can’t have pie for dinner? One thing we’ve learned from over 40 years of culinary education: pie is never not a good idea — especially as a main course. The galette we serve to guests at our special events is essentially that: pie crust with a savory filling that works perfectly for a main course dish. Special Events Chef Philipp Hering fills us in on why: “I love making galettes because they combine the fundamentals of both the savory and the pastry kitchen — from the buttery, flaky pie crust to the salty, flavorful filling. Because it’s winter, I developed a hearty, satisfying recipe with potatoes, leeks and parmesan cheese. This recipe, however, can be repurposed for any season, with your choice of seasonal filling.”

leek & potato galette

Leek and Potato Galette with Fresh Herbs
Makes about 3-4 servings

For the dough

Ingredients:
1 cup all-purpose flour
½ cup cornmeal
¼ teaspoon salt
½ cup grated Parmesan cheese
10 teaspoons cold butter, cut into ½ inch cubes
6 tablespoons ice water

Preparation:

  • Using a Kitchen Aid stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment, mix together the flour, cornmeal, salt and Parmesan cheese until completely combined.
  • Add the butter and mix until you get a crumbly texture with pea-sized pieces of butter. Continue mixing and slowly add the water.
  • Once you have a cohesive mixture, form the dough into a ball with your hands.
  • Form a disk, and wrap with plastic wrap. Chill for at least 30 minutes before using.

For the filling

Ingredients:
3 potatoes, peeled, medium dice
1 red onion, medium dice
2 leeks, cleaned, medium slices
2 tablespoons butter
Salt and pepper to taste

Preparation:

  • Place the potatoes in a medium-sized saucepan and cover with about an inch of water. Bring to a boil and strain. Set aside.
  • Heat a large sauté pan over medium heat and melt the butter. Sauté the onions, leeks and potato until tender, about 10 minutes.
  • Add salt and pepper to taste. Strain excess liquid and let cool.

leek & potato galette

Assembly

Ingredients:
1 egg, whisked
1 cup fresh herbs (such as parsley, dill, tarragon, thyme or rosemary)

Preparation:

  • Preheat oven to 375° F.
  • Roll out the dough using a rolling pin to about ¼-inch thick disk. Rotate the dough with every pass of the rolling pin to ensure an even circular form and prevent sticking.
  • Place the dough onto a sheet tray lined with parchment paper.
  • Place a large spoonful of the filling in the middle of the disk and spread it out to form a circle, leaving 1½-inch of dough at the edge. Fold the edge in towards the filling, leaving the middle exposed.
  • Brush the crust with the prepared egg wash and place in the oven for 20 minutes.
  • Garnish with fresh herbs.

Learn more about hosting your next event at ICE.

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By Michael Laiskonis — Creative Director

Long before we turned on the lights — and all of the machines — in the ICE Chocolate Lab, I began formulating a mission statement of sorts. In addition to exploring the fundamentals of chocolate-making and sharing that knowledge with our students, I also wanted to create a space that fostered a sense of community beyond our four walls. Over the years, we’ve opened up the lab to chocolate and pastry professionals of all stripes, not to mention scores of guests who just love tasting our efforts. As we’ve learned to make better chocolate, we’ve also added our own voice to conversations within the industry. This February, we’re taking advantage of our unique venue to promote the exchange of ideas with our inaugural chocolate symposium, Roots of Cacao.

Test Roasting Cocoa Bean Samples

Roasting Cocoa Bean Samples

I’m excited to announce that the ICE Chocolate Lab will host a one-day series of demonstrations, tastings and panel discussions on Sunday, February 4th. The title, Roots of Cacao, evokes not only the rich cultural history of chocolate, but also the growers and origins responsible for supplying their precious harvest. We can also trace the journey from cacao bean to finished chocolate bar by exploring the many flavors hidden within and the processes that unleash them. As much as chocolate reflects tradition, its evolution is also dependent upon innovation. While we ponder the complex path that chocolate has taken, we must also address the opportunities and obligations to foster a sustainable future.

To help us navigate these varied topics, we’ve enlisted a roster of expert presenters to share their knowledge — from industry insiders and academics, to pastry chefs and passionate connoisseurs. Featured presenters include Bill Yosses, founder of Perfect Pie Company and former White House pastry chef; Maricel Presilla, restaurateur and author of “The New Taste of Chocolate;” Clay Gordon, author of “Discover Chocolate;” and Roger Rodriguez, pastry chef and partner of Cacao Prieto (also an ICE alum!). Together, we’ll discuss how post-harvest processes at the origin lay the groundwork for the flavors in a finished chocolate bar, and how a pastry chef might harness those flavors in a finished dessert. We’ll explore the emerging culture of “craft” chocolate and how the industry is addressing sustainability on a larger scale. Attendees will taste the spectrum of chocolate’s expressions, from artful modern confections to the alluring drink our ancestors enjoyed. I, for one, am looking forward to all of the information and inspiration on tap. In the coming weeks I’ll share more about the presenters with further details on their sessions.

Laiskonis_Chocolates_Hazelnut

Chef Laiskonis’ Hazelnut Chocolates

Roots of Cacao symposium is open to the general public and the sessions have been designed to be accessible to all, no matter one’s knowledge of or experience with chocolate. I would recommend it to anyone who’s curious to learn more about the roots of our favorite confection. Plus, the more we understand where chocolate comes from and how it’s made, the more we appreciate those efforts. But a word of warning: as someone who has taken the deep dive myself, I often say that the more we learn about chocolate, the more we realize what we don’t know! Hope to see you there.

Space is limited — register today for Roots of Cacao.

 Want to take a deep dive into Pastry Arts? Learn more about ICE’s career training programs.

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It’s hard to believe that it’s already time to start planning events for 2018. If your New Year’s resolution is to be a better cook, baker or cocktail maker, you and your guests will love learning new skills at ICE. ICE’s Special Events department hosts over 400 culinary events every year, and we turn each event or celebration into a fun, gourmet experience.

figs in a blanket

To give you a taste of what’s in store when you host an event at ICE, Philipp Hering, ICE’s Special Events lead chef, is sharing one of our most popular, vegetarian-friendly bites: figs in a blanket with whipped goat cheese mousse – all of the tender, flaky, buttery goodness, with a feel-good substitution of juicy figs. Who says a healthy 2018 can’t be tasty, too?!
 

figs in a blanketFigs in a Blanket with Whipped Goat Cheese Mousse
Yield: 25 pieces

Figs in a Blanket

Ingredients:

1 sheet puff pastry, cut into 3-inch triangles
7 large figs, cut into quarters
1 cup sugar
2 eggs, beaten with 2 tablespoons water (egg wash)
Goat cheese mousse, recipe below

Preparation:

  • Preheat oven to 400°F.
  • On a sheet pan, lay the figs skin side down. Sprinkle liberally with the sugar and bake for 5 minutes, or until caramelized. Let cool. Lower the oven to 350°F.
  • Lay one piece of puff pastry on a clean surface and place a cooled fig onto the wide end of the triangle. Roll pastry and seal the end with the egg wash.
  • Place the rolled figs on a sheet tray and bake until golden brown, about 10 minutes. Let cool.

Goat Cheese Mousse
Yield: 1 cup

Ingredients:

½ cup heavy cream
4 ounces goat cheese, brought to room temperature
1 bunch chives, finely sliced

Preparation:

  • In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment, whip the heavy cream until very stiff. Set aside.
  • In a separate mixing bowl, use a wooden spoon and beat the goat cheese until very soft and smooth.
  • Slowly fold in the whipped cream, a third at a time until well incorporated.
  • Fold in the chives, and season to taste with salt and pepper.
  • Pour mixture into a pastry bag (or alternatively put in a bowl) until ready for use. Either pipe or spoon the mixture on top of the ‘figs in a blanket’.

Learn more about hosting your next event at ICE.

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By Caitlin Raux

“The future of food is cooking — is all of us cooking,” said Melissa Clark on Monday night to a roomful of guests ranging from food industry pros to zealous foodies at the Institute of Culinary Education. The occasion was the third annual “The Next Big Bite” event presented by Les Dames d’Escoffier, and the question on everyone’s mind: what is the future of food? The prolific New York Times food writer was joined by fellow panelists Padma Lakshmi of Bravo’s Top Chef, Kerry Heffernan, executive chef of Grand Banks; Susan Ungaro, president of the James Beard Foundation; Missy Robbins, ICE graduate and chef-owner of Lilia, and Pascaline Lepeltier, Master Sommelier, all moderated by Dana Cowin, chief creative officer of Chefs Club and former editor-in-chief of Food & Wine. Heads nodded and occasional waves of laughter rippled through the crowd as the panelists explored the future of food.

The Next Big Bite

So what was the consensus? For starters, food and how we eat are getting more expansive. On a global level, food is becoming “post-ethnic,” in the words of Lakshmi, who noted the way that culinary trends mirror global migration and the convergence of cultures. Also expanding is the concept of food, and in particular, what is considered good food. Chefs, for example, are using wider nets to choose fish to serve in their restaurants. Heffernan explained how unfortunate nomenclature keeps certain, readily available fish — like dogfish — from gaining the popularity that their flavor merits, and the brilliant marketing tool that chefs sometimes use to get unjustly maligned seafood back on menus: just change the name.

As for cooking approaches, prepare yourself for “stem-to-stalk” cookery, the veggie counterpart of nose-to-tail, with a focus on using vegetables in their entirety, simultaneously reducing food waste and making vegetables the star of the show (or plate). But Missy Robbins reminded the audience that balance is key, and that focusing on vegetables doesn’t mean rejecting meat.

The Next Big Bite

ICE President Rick Smilow, Padma Lakshmi and Missy Robbins

On a more rudimentary level, Clark rallied in favor of (confidently) making anything for dinner — be it eggs or a bowl of oatmeal — as long as it’s delicious and what you’re craving. Taste trumps tradition; cooking need not be complicated. So how can people feel more comfortable in the kitchen? Lakshmi suggested starting early: get cooking back into schools. Lakshmi noted that the disappearance of programs like Home Economics has created a generation that doesn’t know their way around the kitchen. School lunches, too, were on the menu on Monday evening, or rather, how to fix them. “Vote,” stressed Heffernan, who championed more political activism in the food community to bring about changes like healthier lunches for children and better food regulations.

When it comes to dining out, Robbins’ new restaurant Lilia in Brooklyn exemplifies the rise of fine casual dining — creative, bold flavors served in an informal, casual environment. We’re seeing “[t]he casualization of great food, truly great food,” Cowin observed. Eateries are swapping white tablecloths for reclaimed wood and trading the velvet rope for cozy neighborhood vibes, a sentiment captured by Robbins, who shared, “I always wanted to create the restaurant that I wanted to go to every night, like it was home.” Judging by the nightly crowds at Lilia, there is no doubt it’s a place that many would like to call home — or at least eat there every night.

The Next Big Bite

At “The Next Big Bite,” the panel went beyond the flavors to be expected on menus and Instagram feeds, and offered practical ideas for effecting social change. When it comes to the future of food, the collective mindset is moving toward being healthier, more global and more conscious of the impact of food on communities. And cooking more is the key: cook more, cook what makes you feel good, and when you’re not cooking, enjoy the growing number of eateries that are on a mission to serve delicious food with no pretense. If and when you do see dogfish or porgy on the menu, don’t be put off: give them a try, too.

For more from the evening’s discussion, follow the hashtag #NextBigBite2017 on Twitter.

Feeling culinarily inspired? Learn more about ICE’s career training programs.

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On October 20, 2017, ICE will host world-renowned Brazilian chef Alex Atala for the “Recipes for a Delicious and Sustainable Future” dinner to benefit the MAD / Yale collaboration. The evening’s theme will be sustainability — one of ICE’s core commitments — as well as how chefs can be agents of change and, of course, exquisite food. We would be hard pressed to a better proponent of cooking sustainably or a better example of finding one’s culinary voice, than Chef Atala.

Alex Atala

Chef Atala, widely considered the best chef in South America, was recently featured on the Netflix series Chef’s Table. Early in his career, at a time when French cuisine lorded over fine dining in Brazil, Chef Atala found himself struggling to cook as well as his French counterparts. In his Chef’s Table episode, a very candid Chef Atala explains a transformative moment of reflection: “I’m a tattooed man, I am an outsider. I am Brazilian. This is who I am,” he said. “If I’m not able to make a French dinner as good as a French chef, nobody could do a better Brazilian dinner or a Brazilian experience than me.” From that moment on, Chef Atala decided to cook solely the cuisine of Brazil. This was a bold, even risky move. But his close connection to the land and local food producers, combined with his embrace of native ingredients — from the Amazonian fish pirarucu to hearts of palm to ants — resulted in extraordinary dining experiences. In 2013, Chef Atala was featured on the cover of Time Magazine above the headline “The Gods of Food,” and in 2014, his São Paulo restaurant D.O.M. was ranked number 6 on the World’s Best Restaurants list.

Time Magazine gods of food

For this one-night-only dinner at ICE, Chef Atala will prepare a tasting menu centered on sustainability. To Chef Atala, who was raised hunting wild game and fishing in the Amazon, using an animal in its entirety comes as a given, as does careful preparation of even the humblest of local ingredients. Joining him in the kitchen will be Ignacio Mattos, chef and co-owner of Estela, Café Altro Paradiso and Flora Bar. Having honed his craft with great chefs like Francis Mallmann and Alice Waters, Chef Mattos is known for preparing seasonal food with bold flavors. The final courses will be crafted by ICE Creative Director Michael Laiskonis, who will share his latest innovations from ICE’s bean-to-bar Chocolate Lab. Between courses, guests will have the chance to hear culinary industry and sustainability insights from Dr. Paul Freedman, Professor of History at Yale University and author of Ten Restaurants That Changed America; Dr. Arielle Johnson, former head scientist at Noma and Director’s Fellow at MIT’s Media Lab; and Mark Bomford, Director of the Yale Sustainability Program.

Benefits of the evening will go toward the MAD / Yale collaboration,* the mission of which is to “equip chefs with the tools they need to take actions that can impact their communities, cities, countries and the rest of the world.”

Tickets for this exclusive event are now available — experience a tasting menu prepared by leading chefs from two continents and expand your thinking on sustainability.

Seating is limited — click here to purchase tickets today.

*MAD / Yale brings together established and emerging chefs and scholars to build a creative and critical appetite for changing today’s food systems for the better. Chefs and students engage in a liberal arts approach to food systems thinking, exploring cross-disciplinary inquiry, and their own leadership potential. In 2016, the groups held the MAD / Yale Leadership Summit, which welcomed eight of the world’s pre-eminent chefs to Yale for a week of study.

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