When it comes to steak, it does matter which way you slice it. With grilling season in full swing, you’d be wise to learn the simple technique for making every steak more tender and delicious: slicing across the grain.

One of the most common mistakes with steak preparation is not in the cooking — it’s in the cutting. Meat has long muscle fibers, which are naturally chewy and tough: cutting across them makes each piece of meat easier to chew. In a new video from ICE and Wüsthof, ICE Chef James Briscione shows the proper method for cutting steak. Watch and try for yourself next time you fire up the grill (or pan).

Want to learn knife skills and more alongside the pros? Click here for more information on ICE’s Culinary Arts program.

Summer is the season for seafood. Whether you’re dreaming of sushi like Jiro or picturing the perfect seafood cookout, learning how to properly fillet a fish is essential. But we get why you’ve been putting it off: it’s intimidating. That’s why ICE and Wüsthof teamed up to roll out a new video demonstrating the correct technique for breaking down a whole fish. Watch as Chef Sabrina Sexton, ICE’s Culinary Arts program director, uses a range of Wüsthof blades to fillet a beautiful red snapper. Check out our tips below, outlining the technique, then head to your local fishmonger and make your seafood dreams a reality.

Chef Sabrina’s Guide to Filleting:

  1. Using kitchen shears, snip off the dorsal and pectoral fins (you can see where these fins are located in the video), to prevent them from sticking to your hands (optional).
  2. Using a fish fillet knife, start by making a 45-degree angle cut behind the skull down to the spine.
  3. Next, make a shallow cut along the dorsal fin from head to tail.
  4. Gliding your knife over the bones, trace a shallow cut along the belly from tail to head.
  5. To loosen the fillet, insert your fillet knife and slice towards the tail.
  6. Then, using your chef’s knife, remove the fillet by slicing over the surface of the spine from tail to head. While doing this, you will cut through a few small bones — don’t worry, that’s normal.
  7. Trim away the small row of belly bones. Then use your fingertips to feel for any pin bones and carefully remove them using tweezers. Slice the fillet of fish into portions of your choosing.

Ready to take your culinary skills to the next level? Click here for more information on ICE’s career programs.

 

If you want to cook like a pro, it’s essential to master the fundamentals. That’s why ICE culinary students start their training by learning the proper techniques for basic cuts: from slicing and dicing to a julienne and chiffonade.

In a new video from ICE + Wüsthof, Chef James Briscione, ICE’s Director of Culinary Research and two-time Chopped champion, demonstrates the proper technique for three basic cuts: the slice, the dice and the julienne, just as he does with ICE culinary students. They look simple, but don’t skip these essential skills — mastering these cuts will make you a better, more efficient chef, as you use them again and again for mise en place and more.

Three tips from Chef James:

  1. Slice: The key to slicing is smooth, long cuts. Let the knife glide through the item you are cutting with a smooth sliding motion, rather than just pushing the knife through.

  2. Dice: Dicing should give you perfect cubes. It’s all about consistency — to get the right shape, every cut must be the same 1/2 inch wide, 1/2 inch long, 1/2 inch tall. Use a ruler when you first start to help improve your consistency.

  3. Julienne: Julienne will reveal all of the flaws in your cutting technique. Make sure that your knife moves straight up and down, meaning it should form a perfect 90˚ angle with your board when it makes contact. But also be aware of how the knife lines up. You want to make sure that the knife tip and handle are in a perfect line, not with the tip of the knife leaning to the left or right of the handle. In other words, the knife should also form a 90˚ angle with the edge of the table.

Think culinary arts is your calling? Click here to learn about ICE’s career programs.


When it comes to making layer cakes, it’s all about the tiers — and not the crying kind, though beautiful, Pinterest-worthy layer cakes can occasionally cause some waterworks. Achieving those perfect tiers, however, can be tricky — making a layer cake isn’t exactly, well, a piece of cake. But with the right tools and an expert teacher, it can be. That’s why ICE + Wüsthof have partnered to present a new knife skills video demonstrating the proper knife and technique for splitting a cake into layers. Watch as ICE Chef Sabrina Sexton levels a pound cake into perfect tiers using a serrated bread knife (and don’t miss the stunning layer cake at the end).

Want to sharpen your culinary or pastry skills? Click here for more information on ICE’s career programs.

 

Bright, fresh and packed with flavor, learning to cook with herbs is an essential part of a future chef’s training. A beautifully plated, delicious dish often seems incomplete without at least a hint of greenery. But selecting herbs to adorn your dish is only half the battle — the other half is prepping them. Chefs use different techniques to ensure each herb is handled with care. Understanding these basic cuts is key to a solid foundation in the kitchen — which is why ICE and Wüsthof partnered to create a video demonstrating the proper way to use a classic chef’s knife to cut three herbs: an expert chiffonade with basil, a neat chop with parsley and a smooth slice with chives. Watch, practice and repeat.

Knife Skills Tips from Chef James Briscione

 Chiffonade:

  • Arrange the leaves into a neat pile in the center of your cutting board. Tightly roll the leaves into a cigar shape and hold secure with one hand.
  • Position your knife at one end of the rolled herbs with the knife tip on the board, the heel and handle of the knife lifted high above. Make one smooth slicing motion so that the curve of the blade glides along the cutting board. The idea here is to slice through the herbs, not down onto them, to avoid crushing them. When the heel of the blade reaches the board, lift the knife back to the starting position. Point down on the board and line up your next cut. Continue repeating this motion until all herbs are cut.

Chop:

  • Arrange the leaves in the center of your cutting board. Gather into a tight ball and hold secure with one hand.
  • As with chiffonade, position your knife at one end of the herbs with the knife tip on the board and the heel and handle of the knife lifted high above. Make one smooth slicing motion so that the curve of the blade glides along the cutting board. When the heel of the blade reaches the board, lift the knife back to the starting position. Point down on the board and line up your next cut.
  • Then gather the cut herbs back into a tight ball and rotate the ball 90 degrees. Slice all the way through the herbs again, as above. Repeat until herbs are chopped.

Slice:

  • Place herbs in the center of your cutting board and hold them firmly with one hand.
  • Position your knife at the spot where you want to make the first cut. Curl your non-knife hand into a loose “claw” with your thumb tucked behind your fingers. Rest the front of your knuckles against the side of the knife blade to serve as a guide as you cut. The tip of the knife should extend just ½-inch beyond the front edge of the item being cut.
  • To cut, slide the knife forward driving the tip of the knife toward the cutting board while providing gentle downward pressure. It is essential to move your knife forward and down at the same time for efficient cutting. Continue the motion down until the heel of the blade reaches the cutting board. Lift the knife and reposition your hands for the next cut.

Learn to chop, slice and cook like a pro — click here for more information on ICE’s career programs. 

A chef without a good knife is like a steak without salt — just plain wrong. According to ICE Chef Ted Siegel, a knife is the “singular most important piece of equipment that we use in the kitchen.” ICE and Wüsthof — a premier culinary school and a maker of expertly crafted knives — have been partners for more than 30 years, joining forces to prepare professional chefs and at-home cooks to work with more precision and confidence.

As any chef will tell you, knife skills are equally crucial. That’s why ICE and Wüsthof are combining over four decades of culinary technique and 200 years of craftsmanship to roll out a new video series: knife skills. From slicing and dicing to chiffonade, cake leveling, filleting fish, or finding the grain for the perfect steak, the beauty of expert craftsmanship and skilled chefs shines through — and the result is nothing less than culinary art.

Watch the trailer below for a sneak peek of the knife skills videos coming soon.

Ready to sharpen your culinary skills? Click here for more information on ICE’s career programs.