Last Friday, I told you about how the amazing stewarding team at ICE helped me procure a pig for my annual pig roast and I promised you an update. Cooking a whole pig surely sounds like a daunting task but once you tackle it, you’ll realize that it’s not all that hard. Over the years we’ve researched and experimented with different techniques before perfecting our chosen method of spit-roasting over hot coals. After brining the pig overnight and transporting it in a cooler to New Hampshire, we built a stone-lined pit and stuffed the pig with a mixture of garlic, rosemary, thyme and fennel. Cooking a pig on a spit requires diligent rotating, raking of the coals, and adjustment of the height of the spit so that the pig cooks evenly and slowly. After about 6 hours of doing just that, we had a delicious pig that had reached perfection. Check out the stuffing recipe after the jump. More…

Because of the variety of classes and cuisines taught at ICE, we have access to some of the finest quality ingredients that you may not be able to otherwise find at your local grocery store. Director of Purchasing, Josh Pappas, and the entire team in the Stewarding Department work hard to make sure that ICE students have access to anything and everything they could possibly want to cook. When I started planning my annual pig roast, Josh was kind enough to help me procure a pig through one of their vendors. Right now, the pig is locked away in the walk-in refrigerator on the fourth floor. This weekend, I’ll take him (or her) to New Hampshire to be roasted on a homemade spit for about 6 hours until the meat is tender and juicy. Though there are many different ways to cook a pig, I believe the secret to a succulent pig is a flavorful brine. Over the years, I’ve experimented with different recipes, but I decided to go Italian this year. My recipe is after the jump. Check back on Tuesday to see how it turned out! More…