At ICE, we make it our mission to help students find their culinary voice — that creative drive within each of us that determines how we express ourselves through food. Whether it’s a career training program, a recreational course in pie crusts or a special event featuring handmade pasta, we’ll give you the tools to hone your culinary creativity. Join us as we ask some of today’s leading food industry pros to share their culinary voice.

“My culinary voice is my Korean style,” begins ICE alum and James Beard Award nominated chef Rachel Yang. The co-owner of four hit restaurants in Seattle and Portland — Joule, Revel, Trove and Revelry — offers diners a unique experience, combining the culinary traditions of her Korean roots with a sense of place — the Pacific Northwest. In this video, Chef Rachel explains how she tempers Korean cuisine to her guests’ palates, and the result is addictively delicious dishes like geoduck fried rice. Watch now as Chef Rachel Yang shares her culinary voice.

 

At ICE, we make it our mission to help students find their culinary voice — that creative drive within each of us that determines how we express ourselves through food. Whether it’s a career training program, a recreational course in pie crusts or a special event featuring handmade pasta, we’ll give you the tools to hone your culinary creativity. Join us as we ask some of today’s leading food industry pros to share their culinary voice.

The chef behind such creations as a whole, crispy Sasso chicken served on a bed of smoldering hay, ICE alum Greg Proechel (Culinary Arts, ’09) has a proclivity toward bold, flavor-forward dishes with the occasional touch of whimsy. Asked to describe his culinary voice, Greg says it comes down to balance — a simple balance between acid, fat, texture and salt, plus one more essential element. Watch the video and discover the final ingredient in Greg’s culinary voice.

Find your culinary voice with ICE — learn more about our career training programs.

 

At ICE, we make it our mission to help students find their culinary voice — that creative drive within each of us that determines how we express ourselves through food. Whether it’s a career training program, a recreational course in pie crusts or a special event featuring handmade pasta, we’ll give you the tools to hone your culinary creativity. Join us as we ask some of today’s leading food industry pros to share their culinary voice.

For Chef Ashley Merriman, her culinary career began at the dish pit. Before competing on Top Chef and graduating from ICE’s Culinary Arts program, she worked as a dishwasher after school. One afternoon, the restaurant’s chef was making a batch of tuna salad and asked Ashley to season it with white pepper instead of black. Having never experimented with seasoning before, Ashley really tasted the difference — a brief moment in tasting that had “a big influence on” Ashley. Since that day, her goal was to cook professionally. Today, the co-chef of NYC’s acclaimed restaurant Prune couldn’t imagine her life going any other way. Watch the video to hear Ashley dish on her unique culinary voice.

Find your culinary voice with ICE — learn more about our career training programs.

 

At ICE, we make it our mission to help students find their culinary voice — that creative drive within each of us that determines how we express ourselves through food. Whether it’s a career training program, a recreational course in pie crusts or a special event featuring handmade pasta, we’ll give you the tools to hone your culinary creativity. Join us as we ask some of today’s leading food industry pros to share their culinary voice.

Donatella Arpaia — restaurateur, cookbook author and Iron Chef judge — made a name for herself through her award-winning restaurants that combine classic, delicious cuisine with modern surroundings. The talented restaurateur, who spent a brief stint as a corporate attorney before pursuing her passion for hospitality, helped earn her restaurants serious food world acclaim, including a James Beard Award nomination for Best New Restaurant. Asked to describe her culinary voice, Donatella confided that it’s very much a reflection of her own personal style — something that’s helped to bring her professional success. Watch the video to see what that winning combination means for this talented hospitality expert.

Find your culinary voice with ICE — learn more about our career training programs.

 

At ICE, we make it our mission to help students find their culinary voice — that creative drive within each of us that determines how we express ourselves through food. Whether it’s a career training program, a recreational course in pie crusts or a special event featuring handmade pasta, we’ll give you the tools to hone your culinary creativity. Join us as we ask some of today’s leading food industry pros to share their culinary voice.

Like choosing a favorite child, it’s not easy to choose a favorite restaurant. Still, when taken to task, top chefs consistently pick Marea, Chef Michael White’s Michelin-starred mecca for Italian seafood that sits pretty on Central Park South. Bobby Flay describes it as “probably my favorite restaurant in the city — from perfect crudo to pasta with sea urchin, Michael White brings his A-game always.” Asked for his preferred Big Apple eateries, Anthony Bourdain named not one but two Michael White restaurants: “I’ll go to [Osteria] Morini for a bowl of pasta, or if I really want to blow it out I’ll go to Marea, but just for the pasta. Not that the fish isn’t magnificent, but I’ll go in and eat three or four different pastas. If I am carb-loading that would be a good choice.” Even the James Beard Foundation chose Marea as the Best New Restaurant in 2010. Other restaurants from Chef White’s Altamarea Group, like Ai Fiori, are time-tested New Yorker favorites, too.

So what does the king of elegant seafood and craveable carbs think about when he’s in the kitchen? What is his culinary voice? It begins with something he likes to call “taste memory.” Watch the video and discover what that means for Chef Michael White.

Find your culinary voice with ICE — learn more about our career training programs.

 

At ICE, we make it our mission to help students find their culinary voice — that creative drive within each of us that determines how we express ourselves through food. Whether it’s a career training program, a recreational course in pie crusts or a special event featuring handmade pasta, we’ll give you the tools to hone your culinary creativity. Join us as we ask some of today’s leading food industry pros to share their culinary voice.

Restaurateur and chef Marc Forgione savors a challenge. Since winning Iron Chef in 2010, as well as earning the first Michelin star for his eponymous restaurant that same year, he has continued to wow diners with his bold and delicious takes on local ingredients. Chef Forgione — who, according to the New York Times, “excels at simplicity” — shares the five straightforward ingredients of his culinary voice.

Start honing your own unique culinary voice — learn more about ICE’s award-winning career programs.

At ICE, we make it our mission to help students find their culinary voice — that creative drive within each of us that determines how we express ourselves through food. Whether it’s a career training program, a recreational course in pie crusts or a special event featuring handmade pasta, we’ll give you the tools to hone your culinary creativity. Join us as we ask some of today’s leading food industry pros to share their culinary voice.

Duff Goldman’s slogan is simple: If you can dream it, we can create it. Whether it’s a lifelike Betty White cake or a multi-tiered, hand-painted wedding cake (with or without lasers), the pastry chef and owner of the Baltimore-based, wildly popular Charm City Cakes bakery and star of Food Network’s Ace of Cakes is up for any confectionary challenge. We asked Duff to share his culinary voice with us, and his response should come as little surprise to anyone who’s seen his creations: “I really like to make people smile; I like to make them laugh; and I always like to make them think.” Watch the video and find out more about Duff Goldman’s unique culinary voice.

Find your culinary voice with ICE — learn more about our career training programs.

 

Sometimes, a moment of inspiration can change the course of your career. Whether it’s an ah-ha! moment or a taste of something outstanding, it sets you on a new path of discovery. For Pastry Arts student Calvin Luk, his moment came during a visit to the York Cocoa House Chocolate Emporium in the U.K. The Hong Kong native had relocated to York to study archaeology, but one sip of the famed York Cocoa House hot chocolate and he knew his future lay in the art of chocolate making.

Soon after his visit, Calvin began working at the acclaimed York Cocoa House. When he realized he was ready to take his education to the next level, he chose the Pastry & Baking Arts program at ICE. Asked why he chose ICE, Calvin explained that he was, unsurprisingly, drawn to ICE’s bean-to-bar Chocolate Lab, led by James Beard Award-winning pasty chef Michael Laiskonis. Once he arrived, Calvin knew he had made the right choice: “I had been studying chocolate-making for some time,” he says. “But it wasn’t until I met Chef Michael Laiskonis that I realized there’s so much more to learn.” What’s more, as a student at ICE, Calvin has had the opportunity to learn alongside not only Chef Michael — both in his career program courses and during elective classes in the Chocolate Lab — but also from other inspiring ICE chef instructors as well as prominent chefs through volunteering opportunities, like the annual Top Ten Pastry Awards, hosted by ICE each year.

At ICE, we make it our mission to help you take your inspiration to the next level — to pursue your passion and make a lifelong career of it. For Calvin, he’s been able to grasp the fundamentals of chocolate making and to explore his unique culinary voice. And it all began with a sip of delicious hot chocolate.

Ready to discover your own culinary voice? Learn more about ICE’s career Pastry & Baking Arts program.

You’ve probably heard of the “Maillard reaction.” Even if you haven’t heard of it, your food has definitely been affected by it. It’s the chemical reaction between amino acids and sugars that gives browned foods their characteristic color and flavor — think of the toasty, golden-brown crust of a crunchy baguette. While the Maillard reaction generally delivers a desired, flavor-enhancing effect, in certain instances, chefs want to avoid it — in order to preserve the purest flavor of their ingredients.

In a new video, ICE Creative Director Michael Laiskonis explains how he uses vacuum cookers to prevent the Maillard reaction when making creative confections like bright, full-flavored raspberry caramels in ICE’s Chocolate Lab.

Sweet tooth piqued? Ready to study the pastry arts with Chef Michael? Click here for information on ICE’s Pastry & Baking Arts program.

Always cook pasta until al dente, right? Wrong! Because most of us are probably committing more noodle no-nos than we realize, Chef James Briscione will show you how to cook perfect pasta every time in a new video, “You’re Doing it Wrong: Cooking Pasta” — watch now to learn why you should finish cooking pasta in the sauce, step away from the olive oil and, yes, you will need that very large pot to boil the water.

Stop doing it wrong. Start making really good pasta.

Want to learn to cook pasta and more like a chef? Click here for more information on ICE’s career training programs.

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