By Chef/Instructor Ted Siegel

Recently my wife Cheryl and I had the good fortune to spend a few days in La Belle Province (Quebec) and visit one of our favorite culinary destinations: the beautiful city of Montreal.

We arrived, exhausted, late on a Sunday night at a time when most restaurants are closed. We knew that we could rely on one excellent spot to be open, so we made the fifteen minute walk from our hotel to dine at one of the most popular bistros in the city—Restaurant L’Express, open until 3 a.m. seven days a week. L’Express has a reputation for serving consistently solid, traditional French bistro fare. Though the menu does not change often, there are nightly off-the-menu specials. Upon placing your order, the server brings a canning jar of cornichons and a crock of Dijon mustard, both left on the table as condiments throughout the meal. We started with one of their famous dishes, octopus and lentil salad: thin slices of perfectly poached octopus dressed with lemon and olive oil arranged in a ring mold around an earthy lentil salad, deftly seasoned with a shallot vinaigrette. Once the mold is removed, the presentation is similar to a savory charlotte. We also ordered pork rillettes, which were impeccably prepared with the right ratio of shredded lean pork and fat, my only critique being that they would have been better served at room temperature rather than chilled.

Montreal_octopus

Octopus and Lentil Salad

Given my love for organ meats, I always order offal if it’s on a menu. Cheryl and I shared an order of crisp veal sweetbreads with chanterelle mushrooms, garden peas and pea tendrils under a cloud of Parmesan foam. Continuing in the “offal” mode, I had rosy slices of quickly seared and sautéed calf’s liver in a light tarragon pan sauce reduction. Cheryl had a creditable hanger steak with pommes frites. Perhaps we should have stopped after the entrees but decided to indulge in an order of ouefs al neige—a giant quenelle of French meringue gently poached in sweetened milk, the milk then bound with egg yolks, flavored with vanilla beans and turned into a silky crème anglaise, garnished with toasted almonds and threads of spun sugar. After a dinner like that, we needed that walk back to our hotel room.

The following day, after taking a riverboat tour of the St. Lawrence River around the island of Montreal, we had lunch at one of our favorite ethnic restaurants in North America: Stash Café, which specializes in homestyle Polish cooking. The tripe soup, pierogies (of any kind) and the perfectly executed pork schnitzel are well worth the visit.

While researching the Montreal dining scene before our trip, one newcomer intrigued me: Le Comptoir Charcuteries et Vin, a restaurant of 40-50 seats serving a contemporary French-Canadian menu of small tasting plates and an extensive list of charcuterie and house-cured meats. It’s a neighborhood establishment where the service transcends warm, friendly and gracious. However, it was the food that left us speechless. We loved our first meal there so much that we cancelled a dinner reservation at another restaurant and returned three nights later. It is hard to find superlatives adequate enough to do justice to the chef and his execution of a very labor-intensive menu. The kitchen opens directly into the dining room and there are only three people working on the line including Chef Ségué Lepage. I highly recommend virtually every dish, as we sampled almost the entire menu during our two visits—easily the best two meals we’ve had in 2016 (and quite possibly in 2015 as well). Though all dishes were memorable, here are my favorites: house-cured porchetta di testa served with goat cheese fritters and ribbons of pickled zucchini; lobster tart on a savory sablé with tomato confit, tarragon crème fraîche, roquette and gently stewed white onions; tataki of seared veal loin with a purée of sage, Marsala wine reduction, fried sweetbreads and marinated radish salad; and wild blue pleurote mushrooms from Ontario with crab mayonnaise, landjäger sausage, wild garlic and dill. Go to Le Comptoir and you will not be disappointed!

Montreal_charcuturie

No trip to Montreal would be complete without paying visits to Joe Beef and Au Pied Cochon. Fred Morin, owner and chef of Joe Beef, and Martin Picard, mastermind of Au Pied de Cochon, have in common both their connection to famed Québécois chef Normand Laprise—the “godfather” of modern French-Canadian cuisine—and their decadent, over-the-top approach to cuisine, gastronomy and life in general—an approach which I fully subscribe to and worship.

Montreal Joe Beef

Joe Beef

Joe Beef promotes itself as a seafood-centric restaurant but it’s really about meat as well. The portions are large, so go with an empty stomach. Prepare to be well fed in a relaxed atmosphere by an approachable staff. The must-tries on the current menu are the appetizer of crispy calf’s head fritters served with sauce gribiche; salade gourmandea large, thick round of country-style terrine topped with a salad of apples and haricots verts and served with a tranche of grilled peasant bread slathered with an unctuous foie gras parfait; roast quail stuffed with lobster sausage in a light jus of the roasting juices; and the lobster spaghetti, which is why anybody goes to Joe Beef in the first place. Chunks of lobster seared in the shell, then stewed with bacon, cream, Parmesan and fresh herbs, and served atop house-made fresh spaghetti with the texture of satin. We also had a perfectly roasted halibut filet with smoked tomato butter. At this point, we moved on to dessert, but should not have, as they were somewhat of a disappointment. Regardless, Joe Beef is a restaurant that deserves at least one if not numerous visits.

Montreal_Joe Beef

Stuffed Pig’s Foot

Finally, there is Au Pied de Cochon, which is consistently rated as one of the top restaurants in North America. We’ve dined there in the past and feel like a trip to Montreal would be incomplete without a visit to Martin Picard’s “temple” of all things duck, foie gras and pork. Be warned: the portions defy any notion of restraint and are not for the “squeamish”—which is a good thing for me!

On our most recent visit we began with three off-the-menu specials: perfectly fried zucchini blossoms with a caper aioli, a totally hedonistic foie gras pizza with prosciutto and cheese curds, baked in a wood-burning oven with just the right amount of char to the crust, and a disappointing yellowfin tuna belly glazed with soy and maple that sounded great on paper but was horribly overcooked. For our entrees, Cheryl and I had their two most iconic menu items: “Duck in a Can” and the Stuffed Pig’s Foot “APC”. The former is a magret de canard (also known as Moulard duck breast), duck leg confit and foie gras preserved in a tin can with cabbage and vegetables, presented and opened out of the can at the table. The latter is a braised pig’s foot stuffed with foie gras and gratinéed with bread crumbs, served on a bed of a silken potato purée whipped with cheese curds, a variation of the famous aligote from the Auvergne region of France, and a sauce prepared from the braising jus. The pig’s foot was big enough to serve two to four people. It was an “I can’t believe I ate the whole thing” moment!

Also not to be missed: the two central food markets in the city, Atwater market in “Little Burgundy” and Jean-Talon market in “Litte Italy.” You can sample the best produce, cheeses, meats, seafood and prepared foods that this lush and fertile agricultural region has to offer. At the Jean-Talon market, be sure to visit the tiny but well-stocked culinary bookstore, Librairie Gourmande, most notably for their selection of cookbooks from top Québécois chefs. We enjoyed a surprisingly great lunch at La Crêperie du Marché in the Jean-Talon market, which specializes in the famous galettes de sarrasin—traditional savory buckwheat crêpes of Brittany, France. We savored a crêpe layered with béchamel sauce, Gruyère cheese and mushrooms as well as one with ham, cheese, spinach and a fried sunny side-up egg.

I’ll be going to Quebec City soon, so keep an eye out for my next (hungry) chef’s tour.

Chef Ted’s Montreal Hit List

Restaurant L’Express
3927 Rue Saint-Denis
http://restaurantlexpress.com

Stash Café
200 Rue St. Paul O
http://restaurantstashcafe.ca

Le Comptoir Charcuteries et Vins
4807 Boul St-Laurent
http://comptoircharcuteriesetvins.ca

Joe Beef
2491 Rue Notre-Dame O
http://www.joebeef.ca

Au Pied de Cochon
536 Duluth Est
http://aupieddecochon.ca/?lang=en

Atwater Market
138 Atwater Avenue
http://www.marchespublics-mtl.com/en/marches/atwater-market/

Jean-Talon Market
7070 Henri-Julien Avenue
http://www.marchespublics-mtl.com/en/marches/jean-talon-market/

Want to study culinary arts with Chef Ted? Check out ICE’s culinary arts career program. 

 

By Robert Ramsey

You all know Alice Waters, Dan Barber and Rene Redzepi, right? These are the elevators of the humble beet, disciples of the heirloom tomato, pioneers of the potato pedigree. Each is a master chef, overseeing wildly successful restaurants and molding industry practices in the process. These top toques and the hordes of “slow food movement” followers they’ve inspired seem to be gaining ground in one of the most prolific trends in restaurants today: meat in moderation, veggies in abundance. These are the non-vegetarian vegetable eaters. But, like that pair of bell bottoms you picked up in the vintage store, everything old is new again, and vegetable forward cuisine is no exception.

Pea Soup by Chef Robert RamseyIf we trace this trend back…way back…we might find ourselves on the fertile hilltop estate of Monticello, in the rolling piedmont of Virginia. Here, at the home of founding father and devout culinarian Thomas Jefferson, we would have seen some of the most spectacular vegetable gardens in the new world (and still do, in fact, as the property’s gardens are maintained to exacting historical accuracy). The numbers alone are staggering, as Jefferson, who kept extensive records, grew 170 varieties of fruit trees, 330 varieties of 89 different species of vegetables and 15 types of English peas. He grew broccoli imported from Italy, fiery Mexican chilis, French globe artichokes, Native American lima beans and African okra. His garden, pantry and kitchen were a worldly melting pot that came to define American culture and the country’s cuisine.

As United States Minister to France, Jefferson was able to stock his pantry and cellar with the best the world had to offer, returning with wines (680 bottles to be precise), cheeses and all manner of foods never seen before in the Americas. While he is often incorrectly credited with inventing ice cream, he did popularize it in the United States, along with macaroni and cheese, a dish he became so obsessed with that pictures of a “ macaroni machine” were found in his sketchbooks. French fries, Parmesan cheese and Champagne were all first documented in the U.S. by our favorite founding epicurean.

It is in his writing that we discover Jefferson’s incredibly uncommon use of the “meat as garnish” ethos on dining. He took his vegetables as his main course, using meat to flavor, or, accompany his meals. At Monticello he claimed vegetables “constitute my principal diet,” and meals were described as “served in half Virginian, half French style, in good taste and abundance.”

Fast forward two and a quarter centuries to a world where nutrition, food science, environmentalism, global markets and industrial food production all play vastly different roles in how we eat, and we discover Jeffersonian principles on food may still have their place. American foodways are changing every day—and that’s a good thing. Food writer Michael Pollan simply sums up a contemporary approach to Jeffersonian food philosophy: “Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.” As more and more people are thinking this way, chefs are being given creative freedom to invent new and exciting vegetable dishes without the fear that they will sit in the back corner of the restaurant walk-in, waiting to become tomorrow’s family meal. As a native Virginian and classically trained chef in French technique, a lover of vegetables and an insatiable investigator of American regional cuisine, I for one am very excited to see Jefferson’s garden-focused cuisine on the plates in our highest-ranked restaurants (even if he doesn’t always get the credit).

Chef Robert Ramsey

Here at ICE, we are embracing that trend in many ways, but none is more obvious than our hydroponic garden. To be clear, in lower Manhattan, we may never have the opportunity to grow 170 varieties of fruit trees, but we can grow five different varieties of basil and taste the difference straight from the source. We can encourage students to taste vegetables growing right outside the classroom door. We can show them firsthand what it’s like to harvest lettuce five minutes before we make a salad for lunch. And we can show them that vegetables can, in fact, be the star of the plate…again.

The following recipe, in honor of Thomas Jefferson and his favorite vegetable, the pea, checks all the boxes when it comes to a classic Monticello-inspired meal.

Chilled Pea Soup with Virginia Country Ham and Garden Herb Salad

Ingredients:

for the soup

  • 2 oz canola oil
  • 1 medium yellow onion, diced
  • 1 small head fennel, bulb only, diced
  • 2 stalks celery, diced
  • 1 cup white wine
  • 1 pound English peas, shelled
  • 6 cups vegetable stock or broth
  • 1 cup cream
  • 4 oz extra virgin olive oil
  • salt and pepper to taste

 for garnish

  • 8 oz VA cured and smoked ham (I like Edwards Wigwam ham), diced
  • ½ bunch each: mint, chives, sorrel, fennel fronds, bush basil
  • 1 oz lemon juice

Instructions:

  • In a large soup pot over medium heat, “sweat” onions, celery and fennel in a small amount of canola oil.
  • When vegetables are soft and translucent, deglaze with white wine and reduce by half. (Deglaze = pour cold wine into the hot pot, scraping anything stuck to the bottom.)
  • Add stock, cream and a few pinches each of salt and pepper.
  • Bring to a boil, reduce heat to simmer, and cook 20 minutes or so.
  • Transfer to a blender pitcher, working in batches if necessary.
  • Carefully add the peas to the hot liquid and purée until completely smooth.
  • Slowly stream in olive oil and continue to purée.
  • Let soup cool, then chill in the refrigerator for 4-6 hours.
  • Toss herbs with lemon juice. Serve directly on top of chilled soup. Sprinkle diced country ham on top, serve and enjoy.

Pea Soup by Chef Robert Ramsey

Want to study culinary arts with Chef Robert? Click here for more information on ICE’s culinary arts program. 

 

By Caitlin Gunther

Ben Wiley (Pastry Arts ‘06), co-owner of five successful Brooklyn bars, is on the move. Whether he’s scooting to a jiu-jitsu class in Manhattan or popping into one of his bars for a weekly visit, he’s always headed somewhere—that and a passion for the service industry seem to be his calling cards.

ICE Alum Ben Wiley

From his hometown in northern New Jersey, Ben headed west to the University of Illinois to study Japanese. He then traded the Midwest for Yokohama, Japan, where he enrolled in a master’s degree program through Stanford University. It was during this time that Ben developed a love for baking and craft beer. Motivated by a paucity of good, readily available bread, he spent countless hours in his home kitchen trying to create the perfect loaf. When he wasn’t studying or in the kitchen, Ben was a regular barfly and part-time bartender, which served to improve both his language skills and knowledge of good, craft beer. After five years in Japan, Ben returned to New Jersey, at which point, with visions of a small café or bakery in his head, he decided to enroll in the Pastry Arts program at ICE. After completing an externship in one of the hottest kitchens in New York City, Del Posto, he and his brother hatched a back-of-a-napkin plan to open their own business—a neighborhood bar.

Though transitioning from pastry chef to bar owner seems like a leap, the detail- and service-oriented nature of both are a natural fit for Ben. He took a pause from one of his typical, frenetic days to do the ICE alum questionnaire.

ICE graduation year: Pastry Arts ‘06

Location: Brooklyn, New York

Occupation: Co-owner of five bars in Brooklyn: Bar Great Harry, The Owl Farm, Mission Dolores, Glorietta Baldy and Cardiff Giant

Ben Wiley at Mission Dolores

Favorite sandwich spot:

There is a bodega right on the corner of 27th and 8th Avenue, right by FIT. It’s a standard-issue bodega that probably makes the same wraps as every other one in town, but they know me. I get a spinach wrap with chicken, sautéed spinach and some kind of cheese—I always tell them to pick one for me. It’s perfect. It digests well, and I can work right after. It’s six bucks, and it makes me happy. 

Describe a day in the life.

My wife and I get up around 7:30 a.m. I make her coffee every day. I don’t have to get up early, but I like to. With the dog, I walk her halfway to work, then the dog and I come back. I work from home for about two hours—emailing stuff, ordering beers, working on upcoming events and organizing anniversaries. With five bars you end up having anniversaries all the time. I scoot on my scooter into Manhattan and train jiu-jitsu for an hour. I stop by the bodega, grab my wrap, then I scoot to whichever bar I’m working in that day. I generally pop into each bar once a week. I’ll work for about two hours, then come home to start prepping dinner and walk the dog. When my wife comes home, we’ll have a drink (or not—we take a month off drinking sometimes). Then we hang out, put our feet up and laugh at all the nonsense we’ve gotten up to that day. Or I work out again. We work out a lot.

Mission Dolores Brooklyn

Mission Dolores

What inspired you to go to culinary school?

After I got my master’s degree in Japan, I landed a job as a translator for the Japanese government. They shipped me to Fukui, where I lived for three years doing a “suit-and-tie” desk job. It’s hard to find good bread in Japan. There are amazing French bakeries spotted around the country, but the general level of bread was limited to big, fluffy white bread. I couldn’t find the “healthy” bread that I wanted, so I got into baking. I was making bread in bread machines, then experimenting with 48-hour fermented dough and trying to catch yeast in the air. I bought a ton of books. That’s one thing: if I get into something, I get into it pretty seriously.

After five years in Japan, I came back to the states. I moved into my mom’s apartment in Patterson, NJ, working for a garbage collection company and trying to figure out my life. I realized that I’ve always loved bread, so I Googled and found ICE, located right in New York City. “This could be my ticket to a new life,” I thought. I envisioned opening a small bakery or café one day. So I enrolled. When I graduated, I got an externship at Del Posto when it had just opened.

The key is to treat people well enough that they’re succeeding and happy so that they don’t have to take from you to be happy. I say, “Make the people who work for you win first, and you’ll win later.” 

What got you into the bar business?

After culinary school, I moved in with my brother in Carroll Gardens in Brooklyn. He was working in a job where he was doing well, but not happy and looking to shake things up. The craft beer scene was very small in New York at the time. One night over beers, my brother and I started talking about opening up a bar. I remember sitting in our kitchen, literally mapping things out on the back of envelopes— if we sell 10 beers an hour, open eight hours a day—those types of calculations. We both loved the idea. One night we were out at a crappy little bar at 280 Smith Street (where Bar Great Harry is now), and there was a little old guy at the corner of the bar, wearing a suit. I said to Mike, “What’s a guy like that doing here? He has to be the owner.” When he went out for a cigarette, Mike and I followed him outside. “Is this your bar?” I asked. “We want to buy your bar.” The guy smiled and said, “Really? I want to sell my bar.” Three months later the contract was signed, and we completely renovated the space. That was Bar Great Harry. I bartended every day for weeks and weeks until we could hire more staff.

How did studying pastry arts at ICE prepare you for owning bars?

Culinary school, especially pastry, is all about being prepared. The execution, a monkey could do. It’s how well you prepare and measure everything out, that’s what’s important. That skill set is tremendously important to a small business that’s inventory-based. In a service industry, it’s different, but we have liquid that I sell. Everything has to be calculated—what’s the yield from this keg of beer, how many servings do I get, which size servings, how many do we have to sell. That idea of weighing, measuring, preparation, mise en place—that had a tremendous impact on me and how I manage our business.

Bar at Mission Dolores

Bar at Mission Dolores

Advice for anyone considering getting into the bar business?

It cannot be said enough how important your staff is. In a bar, your staff will make or break you. If you’re successful with one bar, you’re going to open two and three. You can’t be everywhere all the time. As soon as you’re not there all the time, you can have all the checks and balances you want, but people will take from you. The key is to treat people well enough that they’re succeeding and happy so that they don’t have to take from you to be happy. I say, “Make the people who work for you win first, and you’ll win later.” Hire people who you trust deep down. You can train people to make a drink. But when I interview people I think about whether I really trust them and whether they really want to be there.

Where do you see yourself in five years from now?

In five, I’ll still be partners with my brother in the bar business. Maybe we’ll have six or seven bars at that point. I think six and seven will be different from the first five, but not sure what form they will take. Hopefully doing something a bit different from before. We’re also looking for houses up the Hudson River.

Ready to launch your new career? Find out more about ICE’s career programs. 


By James Briscione—Director of Culinary Development

Tomayo_BLT

I love the creativity of cooking. Inspiration and culinary discoveries can come from anywhere. Sometimes they’re right under your thumbs. A few nights ago, I was scrolling through Twitter and stumbled across Daniel Gritzer (@dgritzer) talking about an egg white mayonnaise that he and Stella Parks (@thebravetart) had made earlier that day. If you’re not hip to the homemade mayo game, it’s a popular misconception that emulsification requires egg yolks.

The egg white mayonnaise conversation reminded me of a discussion I had with Hervé This a few years ago when he visited ICE to give a demonstration to our Culinary Arts students. In short, his visit culminated in him telling me that he could (though, he insisted, he never would) make an emulsion from his spit! He reasoned that all that is required to create an emulsion, such as mayonnaise, is water and protein—both readily available in human saliva.

Returning to Daniel and Stella’s egg white mayo Twitter talk, reading through the conversation inspired me. My first idea was to substitute the water in the egg white with a flavored liquid—like carrot juice—and use an egg white powder as a source of protein. The next day, I went into the kitchen at ICE and made carrot “mayonnaise” with my students by emulsifying oil into a mixture of carrot juice, fish sauce and lime juice. It worked, and truth be told, it was delicious. As we tasted and discussed, one of my students suggested making it again with tomato—tomayo if you will. I immediately liked the idea and knew where this tomayo should go: on a BLT! After all, a great BLT begins with good bread and mayo, so why not make that mayo out of tomato? Here’s a recipe for tomayo for your next BLT.

Tomayo_BLT_2

Tomayo (Tomato “mayo”)

Ingredients:

  • 50g tomato juice
  • 5g sherry vinegar
  • 10g soy sauce
  • 6g egg white powder
  • 225g canola oil

Instructions:

  • Combine the tomato juice, sherry vinegar, soy sauce and egg white powder in a small bowl and whisk until dissolved—the mixture should become a bit foamy.
  • Gradually add the canola oil, pouring in a steady stream while whisking vigorously until the oil is emulsified.

Or, following the same steps as above, try this variation with carrot juice!

Carrot “mayo”

 Ingredients:

  • 28g carrot juice
  • 5g lime juice
  • 10g fish sauce
  • 5g egg white
  • 265g canola oil

Carrot mayo

Want to study culinary arts with Chef James? Learn more about ICE’s career programs! 


By Caitlin Gunther

On a sunny Friday afternoon, Rob Laing and I meet in a conference room at ICE, a clear view up the west side of Manhattan just outside. Rob is the founder of Farm.One, the organization that grows and tends to the fresh produce and herbs in ICE’s hydroponic farm. Wearing a heather grey tee emblazoned with KALE, he’s agreed to meet with me to discuss a subject he’s passionate about—vertical farming. So passionate, in fact, that he left behind a successful Tokyo-startup career to dedicate himself to vertical farming full time. With the help of his farm manager David Goldstein, Rob brings to hydroponic farming a level of care instilled in him by years of immersion in Japanese culture. Take a look at his Instagram and you’ll see his attention to detail and the neatly composed minimalism that results from it. Start-up minded and forward-thinking, Rob’s not satisfied with growing the same old Genovese basil—he’s after the herbs and greens that aren’t readily available, the stuff that students, chef instructors and even visiting culinary masters like Thomas Keller haven’t before tasted.

In anticipation of forthcoming posts focusing on ICE’s hydroponic farm, I sat down with the man behind the greens to chat about his path to ICE and the state of agriculture and vertical farming today.

Rob Laing First things first: what is vertical farming?

Vertical farming is about moving food production to cities—rooftops, vacant lots or growing things inside buildings using artificial light. Vertical farming is the conceptual vision of this. Then there’s another concept of vertical farming, which is layers of growing areas that use artificial lighting stacked above each other. People started doing this type of vertical farming in Japan with 12 or so layers. With the advances in LED light technology, vertical farming has become way more efficient and less expensive. Ten years ago this stuff would be completely unfeasible.

What’s special or advantageous about vertical farming?

One of the really exciting things about vertical farming is that if you look at our agriculture system, there are so many negative externalities that we don’t even think about. Vertical farming can offer many ways to combat that. If you compare it with mono-culture farming, those are huge, efficient crops but they affect so many other systems with pesticide usage, shipping and so on. With small scale, vertical farming, a lot of those externalities disappear—there are no pesticides, we don’t have to ship anything, and we don’t use manure so there’s no need to even wash what you grow. Granted, vertical farming can be good in certain situations, but not all situations. People tend to think of agriculture as one monolithic thing, but it’s extremely complex—you’ve got vine crops, root crops, large-scale grain, herbs and greens. I think urban agriculture can fit into that herbs and greens category really well.

We’re growing things like toothache plant, purple ruffle basil, papalo, bronze fennel, red shiso (which is ten times better than normal shiso), and ordering new stuff all the time. We’re really trailblazing.

You lived in Tokyo for several years before turning to vertical farming. Have Japanese cuisine or culture had an influence on your work?

Yes. Think about it: what do people love about Japanese cuisine? First, the respect for ingredients—whether you’re a sushi fan or kaiseki fan, it’s about finding the best ingredients, not messing around with them too much and presenting them for people to enjoy. The second thing people love is Japanese attention to detail in service. Sometimes people confuse minimalism for simplicity, but you can only achieve minimalism if you have high attention to detail and quality.

I want to take that same level of respect that chefs have in the kitchen and bring that back to farming. If you look at the way chefs treat food on a plate, we want that same attention to detail in growing, which you can do on a small scale.

Farm one hydroponic farm herbs

 

How does the location inside a culinary school affect the farm?

It’s amazing to be located at ICE and around people who are enthusiastic about food. Plus, the exposure to random encounters is a truly valuable thing and when you’re on your own, you don’t get that. That’s the beautiful thing about being in an educational institution.

Thinking long-term, I love that everyone here supports us growing new things. We want to bring seeds from all over the place and taste new things. It’s a great opportunity for experimentation.

How do the chefs and students interact with the farm?

It’s fun because you get to see people who fall along the whole spectrum of skill levels. Some students come in and have literally never seen something grown. They get excited and ask questions. Then there are chefs here who are much more experienced but deal with the frustrations of not having access to fresh things. Maybe they’ve never tried a particular type of basil before and they try it here and that inspires them. Then at the super level we have visitors like Thomas Keller, Daniel Boulud and Michael Laiskonis, chefs who have such a refined palate that they can try an herb and know exactly how to use it.

Farm.one 1

What are the challenges involved in vertical farming?

You can do a lot of theoretical planning, but achieving is another challenge. Even the installation of equipment took longer than planned. There’s no standard equipment for hydroponic farming. Remember when people started planning bicycles? There were different styles, starting with the Penny Farthing, then they kept tweaking the design. We’re still at the Penny Farthing stage. We’ve tried out different systems and we’ve had to throw out unwieldy equipment and start again. Coming from my startup background, my approach is: if it’s not working, fix it as rapidly as possible or chuck it out and start again.

Another challenge is that there is no guide. Most of what we’re growing, no one has done it hydroponically before. Either that or they’re not talking about it because there’s no research out there. We’re growing things like toothache plant, purple ruffle basil, papalo, bronze fennel, red shiso (which is ten times better than normal shiso), and ordering new stuff all the time. We’re really trailblazing.

What is special about what Farm.One is doing at ICE?
We’re trying to grow things that most people have never tasted before or have never had access to. We’re growing those things in a controlled environment that allows them to be cared for. One example is papalo, an herb I came across in a farmers’ market in Santa Monica. It’s a flat leaf that has elements of cilantro, citrus freshness and is used in Mexican dishes like cemitas. You can find papalo in LA, but in New York you can maybe find it in a Mexican grocery, and even then it’s not really fresh. We can say, “We’ll grow that here in New York,” and no one else in New York is doing that.

Rob Laing hydroponic farm ICE

Take a look inside ICE’s groundbreaking hydroponic farm. 

Check out the Farm One blog.


By ICE Staff

Team up with the New York Jets and the Institute of Culinary Education to upgrade your tailgate and homegate all season long. The Official Jets Cooking School has created an exclusive lineup of hands-on culinary lessons so you can feed your hankering for serious food and football. Bacon lover? Don’t miss Bacon Bonanza, where you’ll learn to prepare everything from bacon-wrapped, cheese-stuffed chicken to a bacon-spiked cocktail. Ready to bring your burger game to the next level? Get your tickets for The Ultimate Burger Bar and ICE chefs will share their tips for cooking your burger to perfection on charcoal grills. Check out the entire roster and gear up to make it an unforgettable season of food, football and fun with the Jets and ICE.

Click here to learn more about The Official Jets Cooking School!

By Caitlin Gunther

One of the great things about studying at ICE is the wealth of experience that each instructor brings to the curriculum. Culinary Management instructor Alan Someck is no exception. As general manager of two perpetually packed Long Island restaurants for decades, Alan developed an understanding of what makes a restaurant not only successful but an integral part of the community. Between this role and his years of consulting work, Alan has the kind of expertise that only comes with time and the opportunity to study changing trends in the industry. At ICE, Alan shares his insights with each aspiring restaurant owner or food business entrepreneur who walks into his classroom.

Alan Someck

A native New Yorker with the restaurant industry in his blood (his father owned a seafood restaurant in Brooklyn), Alan didn’t initially gravitate toward the culinary world. It wasn’t until after college when he moved to San Diego that Alan was inspired to join the food industry. With a shared desire for local, fresh produce, Alan and friends began a food co-op—a small operation where members would assemble in someone’s backyard and handpick their weekly produce. The co-op, which doubled as a community center, grew until it eventually relocated to a larger space that was previously a pool and dance hall. It was during this era that Alan learned to tap into local needs and organize ways to meet them.

Though he loved the Golden State, Alan eventually relocated back east, where he took the helm of two popular North Fork restaurants, both called Millie’s Place. Recognizing that the restaurant space had evolved into more than a place to eat, but rather, an extension of people’s homes, Alan infused Millie’s Place with the same sense of community that he helped to create in the San Diego food co-op.

Alan Someck and student

Alan with ICE graduate

Asked about the lessons gleaned from his time running Millie’s Place, Alan says, “Hook into the community. Get involved and create relationships with customers.” This entails everything from getting to know your customers by name to giving back to the community—Alan’s staff used to cook Thanksgiving dinners for seniors in the area. A second lesson is to observe what’s going on in the industry. Alan explains, “Once a week, I would go out to another restaurant. Go to restaurants and food shows and learn from them. Your food should adapt to the current trends.” Alan’s final piece of advice? Choose the right location. More specifically: a location that fits your concept. This and other vital elements involved in launching a food business or restaurant are the kinds of discussions that Alan has with each of his students. Says Alan, “I start with the premise of, ‘What’s the experience you want to create?’ Let’s work backward from that.”

With New York City as a backdrop for his classes, Alan is also able to incorporate local restaurants and entrepreneurs into his curriculum. From a guest lecture by Gabrielle Hamilton, author and chef/owner of the acclaimed East Village restaurant Prune, to a field trip into the bakery of Amy’s Bread, guided by owner and ICE alum Amy Scherber, Alan ensures that his students receive a comprehensive food business education.

Today, Alan continues to advise restaurant startups, franchises and restaurants aiming to solve operational conundrums. An avid cultural observer, especially when it comes to the way people eat, Alan keeps a constant pulse on the evolving food industry. Whether inside of the classroom or out, Alan is inspiring the next generation of food visionaries and helping to make their lofty business dreams a (profitable) reality.

Want to study with Alan and start mapping out your own food business? Click here to learn more about our Culinary Management program.


By Jessica McCain—Student, School of Culinary Arts

Before culinary school, when I thought of culinary arts and fine dining, my mind always wandered to the French—at the time, I saw the French as the sole proprietors of exquisite cuisine. From classic dishes such as coq au vin to other dishes with fancy names I could hardly pronounce (before coming to ICE, that is), I was sure that I wanted to focus my culinary studies on French cuisine. In fact, I wanted to master the art of French cooking.

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When classes began and we started cooking our way through different regions, I was exposed to numerous different styles and flavors of the world. Initially, I was still fixated on the French—the classic style and elegance associated with this cuisine was more than captivating. And with ideas of restaurant kitchens like Daniel in my head, I couldn’t shake the idea that French fare was the pinnacle of cuisines.

It was when our class curriculum moved on to the Asian region that my mind began to open to different styles of cooking. Before culinary school, I only knew of the more popular Asian dishes—like sushi rolls and pad Thai—but I never realized the complexity and variety of Asian cuisine. Getting to know the different spices, methods of cooking and the time required to prepare the bases to some of the dishes came as a total shock to me. I discovered new flavors and textures in Asian cuisine that I hadn’t been exposed to previously and found myself excelling at the new methods of preparation—to my surprise, preparing items like bao buns and sushi came naturally to me. When we began exploring the flavors of India and Thailand, I knew my idea of one “supreme” cuisine had changed.

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In addition to learning new cooking styles and ingredients, our classes introduced me to equipment I had never heard of before culinary school—one of my favorite aspects of my education here at ICE. For example, in one of our lessons we had the chance to make naan, a pita-like bread that is made with a special oven called a tandoor. A tandoor is traditionally a clay, wood or charcoal-burning oven—the kind used to cook tandoori chicken. We cooked our naan by pressing the dough firmly against the sides of the tandoor to infuse it with the spices, smoke and flavors of the chicken while simultaneously cooking the bread. This technique means safety gloves and great caution are a must. When done properly, this lengthy process produces an absolutely delicious product, and one that I never would have learned by focusing solely on French cuisine.

From toasting and grinding our own spices to making marinades and curries to rolling our own sushi rolls, Asian cuisine is so much more compelling and delicious than I ever thought. I look back to when I was one-cuisine-minded and I could not be happier with my decision to be here. I have a more complex view and ICE has broadened my culinary horizons beyond French cuisine. I can’t wait to enter the world of pastry in the next module!

Ready to broaden your culinary horizons? Click here to learn more about ICE’s innovative Culinary Arts program. 


By ICE Staff 

There’s always something mixing, chopping, baking or searing in the kitchens of ICE. Day and night, the students in our professional career programs are putting the final touches on picture-perfect sweets and savories—and now, we want to share those moments with the world. We’re inviting ICE students to show us your kitchen masterpieces (and the flops because, hey, those are insta-worthy, too!) and win prizes in our monthly #ICEProStudentPhotoContest! Career students who share their best food photos from class have the chance to win prizes and be featured on the @iceculinary Instagram account.

ICE Instagram Contest

Kicking things off on August 1st, the contest refreshes on the first of every month, and each month we’ll announce a new winner. Ready to get posting? Here’s how to enter:

  • Make sure you’re following ICE @iceculinary
  • Upload your best food photos taken in class to your Instagram account
  • Use the contest hashtag #ICEProStudentPhotoContest with every photo that you’d like to submit for the contest
  • Tag @iceculinary in the photo, and mention @iceculinary in the caption
  • Include a caption with the lesson and a brief description of the pictured dish

The winner and prize will be announced by the 7th of the following month. So hit us with your best shots—we’ll be looking!

* See complete rules and regulations below

2016 ICE Monthly Photo Contest RULES & REGULATIONS:

  • This monthly contest will commence on August 1, 2016, and will end on December 31, 2016
  • The photo must be taken and posted by currently enrolled Professional ICE students in good standing. No group or team entries will be accepted.
  • The photo must be taken on ICE premises.
  • Taking photos must not disrupt the class in any way and all instructors reserve the right to disallow photo taking in the class if it becomes disruptive.
  • Photos must be in compliance with Instagram’s Terms of Use.
  • Photos must be in good taste. ICE reserves the right to disqualify any photo it deems to be offensive or inappropriate, in its sole discretion.
  • Photos will be judged on each photo’s overall quality, content and creativity, and will be evaluated on the following criteria:
    • Visual appeal
    • Originality
    • Photo clarity
    • Creativity
    • Caption
    • Adherence to photo submission parameters (see below)
  • The winning photo will be chosen by a panel of judges made up of ICE marketing staff, instructors and/or administrative staff.
  • Judges’ decisions are final and binding on all matters relating to the contest.
  • There will be one winner per month, to be announced by the 7th day of the following month.
  • Winner/winning photo will be announced via the @iceculinary Instagram by re-gramming, and posted on its Facebook and Twitter accounts.
  • The sole winner each month will be notified and awarded a gift certificate to a dining/food establishment of ICE’s choice, with a minimum value of $50.
  • All federal, state and local taxes on the prize are the sole responsibility of the winner.
  • No purchase or payment is necessary to enter or win.
  • All entrants and winners agree to release and hold harmless ICE, its representatives, agents, successors, assigns, employees, members, officers and directors, from any and all liability, for loss, harm, damage, injury, cost or expense whatsoever which may occur in connection with preparation for, or participation in, the contest, or possession, acceptance and/or use or misuse of the prize and for any claims or causes of action based on copyright, publicity rights, defamation or invasion of privacy.
  • Entrants agree to give ICE a perpetual, non-exclusive license to use the photo in any and all media, without compensation to the entrant or any other third party. Entrants allow ICE to use the winner’s name and likeness for advertising and publicity purposes without additional compensation.

To learn more about ICE’s various career programs, click here!


 

INSTAGRAM 101

If you’re hoping to improve the look and feel of your Instagram account, take better food photos and learn a few tricks for getting noticed, get better ‘grams with help from ICE: Social Media Manager and Photographer Casey Feehan (@caseyfeehan) and Content Manager (and @thefeedfeed editor) Caitlin Gunther (@caitlin_gunther) will be holding three complimentary info sessions to help you share your best photos and create a unique voice on social media.

ICE Instagram Contest Photo

Salmon tartar, horseradish, scallion ash, puffed barley. Photo credit: @jamesbriscione

Friday, July 29 at 12:15PM in Classroom 34

Friday, August 5 at 12:15PM in Classroom 34

Tuesday, August 9 at 5:15PM in Classroom 9

 

To attend one of these free sessions, email Chef Dalia at djurgensen@ice.edu.


By Caitlin Gunther

There are dishes you learn to cook to impress friends and relatives. Others you learn to prepare a traditional holiday dinner. Then there are the dishes that you learn as basic life skills—cards you can pull from your sleeve on any given day, during any season, and your dinner guests, even the pickiest of them, are bound to be satisfied. Homemade pizza falls into this last category. With a base comprised of just a handful of ingredients—flour, water, salt, yeast and olive oil—you can throw together a pizza using what’s already in your cupboard, adding a few fresh toppings to give it that gourmet touch.

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To master this very essential life skill, I took the Homemade Pizza course with Chef Sue Gonçalves last Saturday at the Institute of Culinary Education. We measured, we mixed, we stretched (the dough) and, ultimately, we feasted. In the course of preparing one focaccia and two thin-crusted pizzas, I picked up some tips for crafting your best homemade pie. Though I highly recommend taking the class yourself—for the first-hand experience and because Chef Sue brings a fun, easygoing energy into the kitchen—I’ll share my tips to whet your appetite for homemade pizza making.

  1. Know your ingredients – Always review your recipe and ingredients before you begin mixing the dough. As I quickly learned in class, if you mistake cornmeal for yeast, your dough is not going to rise. Period. You’ll have to begin the dough mixing process all over again, and while your classmates are moving on to focaccia, you’ll still be kneading your first pizza dough.
  2. Watch your time – We used a recipe that called for active dry yeast. This will accelerate the rise and with the right temperature (either in a warmish room or a proofing box), the dough rising process should take an hour or so. You want to allow the dough to rise until it has doubled in size, but not much longer. If you’re planning to use the dough the following day, refrigerate once it has risen to halt the rise.
  3. Start from the middle – Once the dough has risen, it’s time to stretch it. You’ll notice that pizza dough has a wonderfully stretchy texture. It’s very tempting to dive into stretching and twirling the dough overhead. Not so fast. To begin, place your dough ball on a lightly oiled surface, and, using your fingertips, gently prod the dough beginning in the middle and pushing outward. Work your fingers around in circles to slowly stretch the dough in all directions. Continue until your dough is a large, mostly flattened circle, slightly thicker on the edge and not too thin in the middle. If your dough is too thin in the middle, it won’t be able to support the toppings and may burn if you try to bake it anyway. Rec-Pizza_Class_Caitlin_Gunther_7.23.16-4
  4. Don’t dress on the table – A classic rookie move is to dress the dough on the table and then attempt to transfer it to your baking surface. Always stretch the dough on your table and transfer to a wooden peel (or pan if you are cooking in a regular oven) before adding toppings.
  5. Brush on the olive oil – To get that crispy, crackly crust, use a brush to slather on some olive oil. Use a flavorful extra virgin olive oil for maximum flavor points.
  6. Cornmeal the peel – You know how the bottom of your pizza is always dusted with those golden speckles? That’s cornmeal! Sprinkle some on your wooden peel before spreading your dough on it. That will help you shimmy the dough, as Chef Sue says, off the peel and transfer it into your pizza oven. Rec-Pizza_Class_Caitlin_Gunther_7.23.16-1
  7. Less is more…with sauce – You may have the urge to get wild with the sauce—that gorgeous color, that rich, vibrant flavor. But the truth is, too much sauce makes for soggy, weak crust. To ensure your pizza will have a sturdy base, especially if you eat your pizza New York-style (grab, fold, devour), go easy with the sauce.
  8. Hide the basil – How does one achieve a Margherita pizza, with basil baked into the pizza, without burning those lovely herbs? Sure enough, laying fresh leaves atop your cheese and baking them in a 500+ degree oven will singe those babies and render them bitter herb crisps. The answer: add the basil on top of the sauce, then top with cheese. The cheese layer will protect your herbs from burning. Rec-Pizza_Class_Caitlin_Gunther_7.23.16-2Rec-Pizza_Class_Caitlin_Gunther_7.23.16-5

Pizza making is an art. Prepare it yourself and you’ll appreciate your next corner slice more than ever. With the above tips in mind, learned from Chef Sue Gonçalves of ICE, you’ll be one step closer to mastering your homemade pizza craft.

Want to learn to make pizza and other delicious dishes? Check out our upcoming recreational courses!

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