By Chef Michael Laiskonis

 

I was honored to be invited as a guest chef and presenter at last week’s The Taste of Science dinner at NYC’s Astor Center, just one of many events organized as part of the larger World Science Festival. The dinner was MC’ed by J. Kenji Lopez-Alt, Chief Creative Officer of Serious Eats, and featured dishes from such renowned chefs as Wylie Dufresne of WD50, Owen Clark of Gwynett Street, and ICE alum/co-author of Modernist Cuisine, Maxime Bilet.

 

Left to right: Michael Laiskonis (Creative Director, ICE), Wylie Dufresne (Chef/Owner, WD50 and Alder), Kent Kirshenbaum (Chemistry Professor, NYU), Bill Yosses (Executive Pastry Chef, The White House), Cesar Vega (Research Scientist, Mars)

Left to right: Michael Laiskonis (Creative Director, ICE), Wylie Dufresne (Chef/Owner, WD50 and Alder), Kent Kirshenbaum (Chemistry Professor, NYU), Bill Yosses (Executive Pastry Chef, The White House), Cesar Vega (Research Scientist, Mars)

The public’s ever growing interest in food has also led to a fascination of the underlying science of cooking. A curious (and hungry) crowd of 120 guests attended our sold-out event to taste their way through a unique and entertaining mash-up of a multi-course dinner and a science lecture. Chefs and scientists alike have begun to discover a whole new perspective through such collaborations, matching the creative aspects of cooking with the principles of chemistry, physics, neuroscience, and other areas of study.

 

Each of the evening’s dishes were conceived to illustrate one particular idea or principle, from the fizzy science of carbonation to more complex matters—for example, how our brains weave together the senses of taste and smell toward when registering flavors. As each course was served, the chefs briefly spoke about the inspiration behind their creations, while prominent scientists described the mechanisms at work on the molecular level.

To reinforce the evening’s theme of science and cooking, NYC’s Astor Center was decked out with several chalkboard renderings of complex food molecules.

To reinforce the evening’s theme of science and cooking, NYC’s Astor Center was decked out with several chalkboard renderings of complex food molecules.

 

I have long been interested in the browning and flavor chemistry of cooked foods known as the Maillard Reaction, the delicious interaction of proteins, sugars and heat that gives so many products their characteristic flavor profiles—from roasted meats and freshly baked bread to chocolate and coffee. My dessert course featured these reactions in a handful of different components: roasted white chocolate, brown butter financier, slowly reduced caramel, and crispy nougatine. I was paired with my good friend and chemistry professor at NYU, Kent Kirshenbaum, who presented the history of Maillard Reaction research and helped to demystify how these transformations take place during the cooking process.

Dessert featuring the chemistry behind the Maillard Reaction: Roasted White Chocolate Cremeux, Pistachio Financier. Apricot Caramel, Lemon Sponge, Nougatine, Red Wine Caramel.

Dessert featuring the chemistry behind the Maillard Reaction: Roasted White Chocolate Cremeux, Pistachio Financier. Apricot Caramel, Lemon Sponge, Nougatine, Red Wine Caramel.

 

The dinner began with opening remarks from noted author Harold McGee and a nitrogen-cooled welcome cocktail from Dave Arnold of Booker and Dax. The complete menu for the evening was executed in part by a team of ICE student volunteers and progressed as follows:

 

Carbonation

Dave Arnold and Kent Kirshenbaum

“Fizz”

Gin, Campari, and Champagne Acid

Olfaction

Maxime Bilet and Stuart Firestein

“Les Fleurs Marines”

Cryo-Shucked Shigoku Oyster, Geoduck Clam, Sunflower root Emulsion, Pickled Wild Rose Petals, Sea Beans, Wild Rose, Jasmine, Orange Blossom, and Lychee Aroma Cloud

Fermentation

Owen Clark and Rachel Dutton

“Living Food”

Salad of Spring Radishes, English Peas, Horseradish Yogurt, and Pickled Spruce Shoots

Egg Yolk Gelation

Wylie Dufresne and Cesar Vega

“Eggs Benedict”

Egg Yolks, Salt, cayenne, Deep Fried Hollandaise Breaded in English Muffin Crumbs, and Canadian Bacon

Neuroscience of Taste

Maxime Bilet and Robin Dando

“Noble Roots”

Roasted, Caramelized, and Glazed Roots; Pressure-Cooked Seeds; Aromatic Carotene Oil

Texture

Najat Kaanache and Amy Rowat

“Mini-Genius Apple”

Fresh, Dehydrated, Freeze Dried, and Transmuted Green Apples; Spices, Berries, Herbs, Citrus, and Gels

The Maillard Reaction

Michael Laiskonis and Kent Kirshenbaum

“Conditions of Browning”

Roasted White Chocolate Cremeux, Pistachio Financier. Apricot Caramel, Lemon Sponge, Nougatine, Red Wine Caramel

Opening remarks from author Harold McGee.

Opening remarks from author Harold McGee.

 

The festival included other sold-out, food-focused events, including two held here at ICE. First, on Friday night, was a standing-room-only panel discussion featuring Harold McGee, Maxime Bilet, Marion Nestle, and Ann McBride. Then, on Saturday, I conducted an intensive ice cream workshop with Billy Barlow of Brooklyn’s Blue Marble and Cesar Vega, a researcher at Mars, which provided a microscopic look at the science of frozen desserts.

 

As a cook and an instructor, learning about the science of cooking propels me ever further toward a better understanding of what we do every day in the kitchen and in the classroom, and I’m always looking for new ways to pass along that knowledge of how the composition and function of our ingredients affect every dish we prepare. Check out my ongoing series of professional development classes, which feature an emphasis on food science as a way to refine what we already cook, in addition to conjuring up new creations!

Whether as chefs, cake decorators, specialty food purveyors or caterers, ICE alumni are finding success in a plethora of different avenues in the food world. Check out just some of the alumni finding success and making recent headlines.

*Lots of ICE alumni have been mentioned in The New York Times in the past couple of weeks: Justin Philips’ (Management ’07) Beer Table has opened a second location in Grand Central Terminal. Anup Joshi (Culinary ’04), chef de cuisine of the soon-to-open Tertulia restaurant, was mentioned in the article about chef Seamus Mullen’s cooking for personal health. Kary Goolsby (Management ’01/Culinary ’02) is chef of newly opened raw bar and craft beer restaurant, Upstate, in the East Village. James Sato (Culinary ’03), along with partners, has opened Chuko, a locally sourced ramen shop in Prospect Heights, Brooklyn.

*Time Out New York profiled Carl Raymond (Culinary ’08) and his classes at the Astor Center.

*Maxime Bilet (Culinary ’05) was included in a piece on Bloomberg about the new dinners from the team behind Modernist Cuisine.

*Gail Simmons (Culinary ’99) was interviewed about her favorite vacation spots in the Chicago Tribune.

*Meredith Foltynowicz (Culinary ’10) was quoted in a piece in USA Today about changing careers.

*Andrea Lynn (Culinary ’05) had a recipe from her new book, I Love Trader Joe’s College Cookbook featured in the Daily News.

*Stacy Adimando (Culinary ’10) was interviewed about her new cookbook, The Cookiepedia, in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle.

To connect with these ICE alumni and many more, join ICE’s network on LinkedIn, or follow ICE on Facebook and Twitter

This weekend, ICE participated in the International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP) New York Regional Conference. The two-day conference included a huge variety of speakers, discussions and seminars on a variety of food topics. Events across the city included meals at top restaurants, culinary receptions and discussions of current food issues.

On Saturday at ICE, attendees participated in three panels on the foods of New York. ICE Instructor Cathy Kaufman, who is also the Chair of Culinary Historians of New York and Secretary to The Culinary Trust, organized these sessions. The panels explored the food culture and culinary history of New York and looked at how New Yorkers have eaten over the past two centuries. The panels discussed restaurants, ethnic foods and markets and their roles in shaping the food culture of New York. More…

Scholarship winners Shawn Russell, Luiz Jacob and Andre Robinson


After walking in the Columbus Day Parade with the host of Brindiamo! Orenella Fado, four ICE students were invited to compete in her Brindiamo Scholarship Competition at Astor Center last week. A total of six culinary school students competed in the scholarship sponsored by Brindiamo! on NYC TV. The scholarship was also sponsored by Asti Consortium and the students were required to use Asti Spumante in their dishes. ICE students Luiz Jacob, Shawn Russell, Andre Robinson and Joao (John) Rodrigues all vied to win a two-week all expenses paid scholarship to study at the Italian Food Style Education Culinary Institute (IFSE) in Piedmont, Italy.

After each student prepared their dishes, the winners were announced. Andre Robinson and Shawn Russell both won the two-week scholarship to Italy. Luiz Jacob won first prize and the Director of IFSE was so impressed with him that he offered him a three-month scholarship to study at the school and then work in restaurants in Italy. Congratulations to Andre, Shawn and Luiz!