05. August 2016 · Categories: Recipes


By Caitlin Gunther

When the 2016 Olympic Games kick off in Rio tonight, will you be ready? That is, will you have the appropriate Brazil-inspired cocktail in hand? To help you get ready for the festivities, we tapped ICE Director of Beverage Studies and mixology master Anthony Caporale to concoct for us a pair of cocktails inspired by the host country. With the recipes below, composed largely of Brazilian liquors and indigenous ingredients, you’ll be on your way to gold.
Olympics_Brazilian_Cocktails_8.4.16-9

Keep reading to get Anthony’s mouth-watering Brazilian-themed cocktail recipes!

 

By James Briscione

 

I’ll spare you the standard “When I was kid…summertime/hot day…watermelon juices dripping down my chin…aww, memories” introduction. Instead, I’ll proudly tell you that watermelon is the first food I ever grew myself. Okay, this might still fall under the category of a “When I was a kid” intro, but bear with me. Nearly 30 years later, I still remember digging a small hole in the sandy lot behind our house in Florida and carefully placing the seeds I had saved from a watermelon that my mom brought home from the supermarket. I also remember the excruciating patience it took seven-year-old me as I watered, watched and waited for that vine to produce my favorite fruit in the world.

 

Since then, my tastes have not changed. In New York City, I don’t have a backyard for growing watermelons, but you might catch me pushing a stroller down the sidewalk with a watermelon crammed into the seat next to my son (they don’t fit beneath).

 

While I have been known to simply crack a watermelon open and eat the entire thing with a spoon in a matter of hours, this tactic for watermelon enjoyment ignores the awesome versatility of this summertime staple. If you want to do more with your watermelon than eat it straight off the cutting board in a sloppy mess, read on and we’ll get watermelon into everything on your table, from cocktails to salads.

Video_play_Button_Watermelon

Keep reading to discover three innovative ways to use a watermelon PLUS the complete recipes! 


By
 Jenny McCoy—Chef Instructor, School of Pastry & Baking Arts

 

Did you know that the history of the s’more dates back as far as the early 1900s? Or that marshmallows were being roasted in the late 1800s? Or better yet, that the marshmallow is a confection that has been around for over 200 years? If you’re the average marshmallow consumer and not a food historian, that can be hard to believe. The commercially made and mass-produced treats that seem to have a never-ending shelf life feel like a product of the 1950s to me, right alongside Cheez Whiz. However, there’s more to the history of marshmallows.

Jenny mccoy smores

 

In the briefest way, I shall now tell you the history of the marshmallow.


Keep reading to learn more about the history of marshmallows and s’mores!


By ICE Staf
f

 

There’s always something mixing, chopping, baking or searing in the kitchens of ICE. Day and night, the students in our professional career programs are putting the final touches on picture-perfect sweets and savories—and now, we want to share those moments with the world. We’re inviting ICE students to show us your kitchen masterpieces (and the flops because, hey, those are insta-worthy, too!) and win prizes in our monthly #ICEProStudentPhotoContest! Career students who share their best food photos from class have the chance to win prizes and be featured on the @iceculinary Instagram account.

ICE Instagram Contest

Kicking things off on August 1st, the contest refreshes on the first of every month, and each month we’ll announce a new winner. Ready to get posting? Here’s how to enter:

  • Make sure you’re following ICE @iceculinary
  • Upload your best food photos taken in class to your Instagram account
  • Use the contest hashtag #ICEProStudentPhotoContest with every photo that you’d like to submit for the contest
  • Tag @iceculinary in the photo, and mention @iceculinary in the caption
  • Include a caption with the lesson and a brief description of the pictured dish

The winner and prize will be announced by the 7th of the following month. So hit us with your best shots—we’ll be looking!


Keep reading to see the complete rules and regulations!

27. July 2016 · Categories: Alumni

 

By Caitlin Gunther

 

Picture a culinary school graduate and chances are you imagine a white toque-wearing chef on his or her way into a traditional restaurant setting. Most people wouldn’t think that culinary school could also lead to working in the test kitchen of a food media startup located in Brooklyn’s coolest new creative hub, Industry City. That’s exactly where ICE alum Jiselle Basile (Culinary Arts and Culinary Management ‘14) recently landed—as chef and food stylist for Extra Crispy, Time Inc.’s new breakfast-centric website. Though the Career Services department at ICE set her up with her first food media internship (in the Birmingham-based test kitchen for Cooking Light), Jiselle’s willingness to try something different, leaving both her comfort zone and her hometown of New York City, helped Jiselle land her current gig.

 

Taking a break from such adventures as making green eggs and ham for grownups, Jiselle hopped out of the test kitchen to complete the ICE alum questionnaire. Unsurprisingly, this ICE alum has strong views on culinary school and where to score the best breakfast sandwich.

Chef Jiselle Basile

ICE graduation year: May 2014 (Culinary Arts and Culinary Management)

Location: Brooklyn, New York

Occupation: Chef and food stylist for Extra Crispy

Favorite sandwich spot:
I narrowed it down a lot obviously (laughs). One place is Steve’s Pork Store on Bath Avenue in Brooklyn. They make probably the best Italian sandwich I’ve ever had. And for breakfast—because obviously I have an opinion on breakfast—at the bagel shop I grew up with, Bagel Boy in Bay Ridge, they make a power bagel that has sunflower seeds, flaxseed and millet in a whole wheat bagel. I know a lot of people hate whole-wheat bagels, but this one is delicious. I get a sausage, egg and cheese with ketchup on that bagel and it’s a perfect breakfast sandwich.

 

Keep reading to find out about a day in the life for this chef / food stylist. 


By Caitlin Gunther

 

There are dishes you learn to cook to impress friends and relatives. Others you learn to prepare a traditional holiday dinner. Then there are the dishes that you learn as basic life skills—cards you can pull from your sleeve on any given day, during any season, and your dinner guests, even the pickiest of them, are bound to be satisfied. Homemade pizza falls into this last category. With a base comprised of just a handful of ingredients—flour, water, salt, yeast and olive oil—you can throw together a pizza using what’s already in your cupboard, adding a few fresh toppings to give it that gourmet touch. Rec-Pizza_Class_Caitlin_Gunther_7.23.16-3

To master this very essential life skill, I took the Homemade Pizza course with Chef Sue Gonçalves last Saturday at the Institute of Culinary Education. We measured, we mixed, we stretched (the dough) and, ultimately, we feasted. In the course of preparing one focaccia and two thin-crusted pizzas, I picked up some tips for crafting your best homemade pie. Though I highly recommend taking the course yourself—for the first-hand experience and because Chef Sue brings a fun, easygoing energy into the kitchen—I’ll share my tips to whet your appetite for homemade pizza making.


Keep reading to discover homemade pizza tips from the kitchens at ICE!


By Michael Laiskonis—ICE Creative Director

 

The final steps in processing our bean-to-bar chocolate make up the longest phase of the manufacturing process—a waiting game where the true essence of the bean, its complex flavor and its silky texture are unlocked. At this point, we focus on physically breaking the bean’s coarse texture, revealing subtleties beneath its bitter astringency and liberating its cocoa butter. Though we add ingredients at this stage, there is also an aspect of elimination—the refining stage is followed by conching, which peels away unwanted volatile flavors.

Sifting the Finished Chocolate

 

My last post dealt with handling the roasted bean—crushing it into nibs, separating its shell, grinding it into fluid cocoa liquor and extracting pure cocoa butter. During this final stage, the chocolate maker faces the challenge of tasting a bean’s full potential and identifying the subtle nuances within. While the goal of the “craft” chocolate maker working primarily in single origin batches is often to enable the expression of that bean’s inner essence, an industrial manufacturer’s typical aim is to create consistency from batch to batch, from year to year. Neither approach is qualitatively better or more difficult—just two possible approaches employed in the final stage of chocolate making.

Refining 

Different kinds of machines can carry out the task of refining (stone melangeurs, roller refiners, scraped-surface refiners, etc.). In the lab, our coarse chocolate liquor enters a 10-kilogram capacity ball mill—a temperature-controlled tank that contains roughly 60 pounds of hardened steel-grinding media (ball bearings, essentially, in two sizes). With agitation, the steel balls begin breaking down the fairly large particles in the liquor, refining them down to a target of around 20 microns—in terms of scale, one micron (µm) is one-millionth of a meter (or one-thousandth of a millimeter). More accurately, true particle size in chocolate will lie along a curve, or a distribution, some smaller and some larger than our target. Looking closely at the structure of chocolate, it is simply very small solid particles (cocoa solids, sugar and sometimes milk solids) dispersed in fat—cocoa butter. Because the threshold of perception of a particle on our palate is in the neighborhood of about 35µm, a smooth, creamy mouthfeel depends upon breaking down the solids below that mark. Particles that are too small (below 15µm), however, will create too much surface area for the available cocoa butter, thus adversely affecting the flow properties of the chocolate with increased viscosity.

 

Keep reading to learn more about this vital stage in the chocolate making process. 


By Caitlin Gunther

Where do you see yourself in ten years?
 That’s the question Chloe Vichot (Culinary Management ’15) heard when she was interviewing for admission to business schools after graduating from high school. Though she didn’t say it aloud, in her head the answer was clear—owning a restaurant. A successful career in finance and an ICE Culinary Management diploma later, the Paris native is on the cusp of realizing that dream in New York City. This fall, she will open the doors to Ancolie, a Greenwich Village grab-and-go eatery, where glass jars will be the eco-friendly packaging of choice. Serving fresh takes on the seasonal, home-cooked meals she grew up eating, Chloe is sharing her culinary voice with downtown Manhattan.

Ancolie_Chloe

In the midst of juggling the roles involved in opening a restaurant, Chloe sat down with us to answer the ICE alum questionnaire. 


Keep reading to discover how this ICE alum decided to open up a restaurant in NYC’s Greenwich Village.

 

By Lauren Jessen—Student, School of Culinary Arts and Culinary Management

 

Mastering the art of purchasing can make or break your restaurant. What do I mean when I say purchasing? Purchasing is part of restaurant operations and entails buying enough food and beverages to meet the demand of the restaurant’s customers. It requires organization, planning ahead, diligence, creativity and consistency. As a restaurant, buying more food than you need means inventory and money going to waste. However, if you buy too little of an ingredient and it sells out, you’re faced with unhappy customers and a potentially expensive problem to solve.

Roam Halls-015-300dpi

In my Culinary Management program, the topic of purchasing is an entire unit because of its complexity. By now, I could write a book (or two) on the topic, but for now I’ll share the key things that I’ve learned in class to keep in mind when purchasing for your restaurant.

 

Keep reading to learn Lauren’s tips for mastering the art of purchasing for restaurants. 

 

ICE’s Center for Advanced Pastry Studies (CAPS) is excited to announce an upcoming course on July 17, led by food stylist Junita Bognanni (food stylist for Chef Jenny McCoy’s “Desserts for Every Season“) and food photographer Steve Legato (photographer for Chef Kathryn Gordon‘s “Les Petits Macarons“). Participants will learn trends in food styling, observe and analyze food styling by Junita and a photography shoot by Steve, then have the chance to try their hand at styling food themselves. In advance of this highly anticipated course, we sat down with Junita and Steve and asked them about their respective crafts. 

food photography fish and chips

Junita Bognanni


How do you approach each job to make it unique?

 

One of the things I love about food styling is that each job is one-of-a-kind. Not just the work—the client, the location, the team and subsequently the mood of each photo shoot—are different every time. I don’t have to do much to make each job unique, because that’s the nature of the business!

 

What is one of the most important lessons you have learned along the way?

 

After a job is finished, people remember how it was to work with you almost as much as they remember the work itself. A positive attitude goes a really long way in this business.

 

What’s the biggest mistake you have ever made?

 

I can’t recall a colossal mistake, but I know from experience that small mistakes happen to the best of us and it’s usually the result of rushing. Whether it’s reading a recipe incorrectly, forgetting to set a timer or buying the wrong cut of pork, there’s almost nothing that can’t be fixed if you keep a cool head about you.

 

Read on to learn more about Junita and Steve, as well as what participants can look forward to learning in the class!

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