By Caitlin Raux

 

In the words of Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, “If you're offered a seat on a rocket ship, don't ask what seat.” When Andrew Massetti (Hospitality Management ’14) was offered a position as Community Manager at Spotluck, the rapidly expanding restaurant app that solves the age-old diner’s dilemma, “Where should we eat dinner tonight?” he didn’t hesitate — he got on board. “We launched in New York with 250 Manhattan restaurants. Now, 8 months later, we have over 100 more, and we’ve expanded to Brooklyn, Queens and Hoboken,” Andrew tells me one afternoon at ICE. With a broad smile that rarely turns off, it’s pretty clear that Andrew is fueled by his job. Andrew’s willingness to take a risk on an idea he believed in, combined with his ICE education in hospitality and all things restaurants — from food production and kitchen management to sales and marketing — made him uniquely qualified for this burgeoning area of the startup world.

Andrew Massetti

Read on to learn about Andrew's inspiring path. 

22. November 2017 · Categories: Video

 

At ICE, we make it our mission to help students find their culinary voice — that creative drive within each of us that determines how we express ourselves through food. Whether it’s a career training program, a recreational course in pie crusts or a special event featuring handmade pasta, we’ll give you the tools to hone your culinary creativity. Join us as we ask some of today’s leading food industry pros to share their culinary voice.

 

Restaurateur and chef Marc Forgione savors a challenge. Since winning Iron Chef in 2010, as well as earning the first Michelin star for his eponymous restaurant that same year, he has continued to wow diners with his bold and delicious takes on local ingredients. Chef Forgione — who, according to the New York Times, “excels at simplicity” — shares the five straightforward ingredients of his culinary voice. 

Marc_Forgione

Start honing your own unique culinary voice — learn more about ICE’s award-winning career programs.

18. November 2017 · Categories: Recipes

 

By Lauren Jessen — ICE Graduate + Blogger, A Dash of Cinema

 

I’ve never been a big pie person. I can appreciate a good homemade pie with a thick crust and multiple scoops of ice cream, but it’s not the Thanksgiving dessert that I look forward to most. If you fall into the same anti-pie category as me, try making these hazelnut and cardamom sticky buns instead. The cardamom and hazelnut form a delicious flavor duo, especially when paired with this soft, tender dough.

sticky buns

Keep reading for this finger-licking delicious dessert recipe. 

 

By Jenny McCoy — Pastry & Baking Arts Chef-Instructor

 

A small slice of my career as a pastry chef has been dedicated to introducing bakers to the flavor combination of pumpkin and chocolate. Some of you may have already tasted the duo — if you are one of those people, congratulations and please consider adding some chocolate chips to your Thanksgiving pumpkin pie. However, if you have not had the experience of chocolate and pumpkin combined, stop your holiday baking plans now and redirect your attention to this post immediately. Your Thanksgiving is about to get so much better.

pumpkin bars

Read on to get the recipe for your new favorite fall dessert. 

17. November 2017 · Categories: Video

 

At ICE, we make it our mission to help students to find their culinary voice — that creative drive within each of us that determines how we express ourselves through food. Whether it’s a career training program, a recreational course in pie crusts or a special event featuring handmade pasta, we’ll give you the tools to hone your culinary creativity. Join us as we ask some of today’s leading food industry pros to share their culinary voice.

Alex Guarnaschelli

When it comes to palate training, Chef Alex Guarnaschelli started young. The daughter of a busy cookbook editor, Alex spent her childhood surrounded by a smorgasbord of food and culinary trends. Since then, she’s honed her culinary voice by cooking alongside the best — including chefs like Guy Savoy and Daniel Boulud — and by leading the charge in her own kitchen, the acclaimed NYC restaurant Butter, as Executive Chef.

 

Watch the video and discover why Chef Alex Guarnaschelli is embracing a quieter culinary voice, and learning to say more with less.

16. November 2017 · Categories: Recipes

 

By James Briscione, Director of Culinary Research

 

Your Thanksgiving turkey has a secret; and I’m here to tell it: that bird HATES being roasted in the oven. I know it, your turkey knows it and deep down, you know it, too: roasting a whole turkey in the oven just isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. It consumes a massive amount of time, space and energy, none of which I would be against if the results were impeccable. However, the sad truth is that roasting turkey in the oven is inefficient and the end product is imperfect.

sous vide turkey

I blame Norman Rockwell. Ever since he painted that famed portrait of an American family gazing lovingly at Mom as she places that large, bronzed bird on the table, the whole, roasted turkey has been the Thanksgiving gold standard. I can only imagine how dry the breast of Rockwell’s turkey must have been — he should have painted a 50-gallon drum of gravy in the background because I bet the family would have used every last drop of it.

15. November 2017 · Categories: Recipes

 

By Robert Ramsey — Director of Advanced Culinary Center

 

Searching for inspiration for your holiday table? ICE Chef Robert Ramsey, a specialist in Southern cuisine, is sharing three sides so good it almost hurts to call them “sides” — because, really, any one of these could easily steal the show: creamy sweet potato soup with brown butter, sorghum syrup and sage croutons, Southern-style collard greens with black eyed peas, grilled Chesapeake Bay oysters smothered in garlicky, bacon-y butter… hungry yet? Keep reading to get the recipes. Your holiday guests will thank you.

Creamy Sweet Potato Soup

Read on to learn how to make these show-stealing Southern sides.

 

By Caitlin Raux

 

There are many lessons you might expect a pastry chef to teach students: have patience; read a recipe in its entirety; opt for the highest quality ingredients. For Chef Carmine, ICE’s newest Pastry & Baking Arts instructor, his most important lesson is simple: stop saying no to yourself. Because, according to Chef Carmine, a former military sergeant who trained as both a ranger and paratrooper, confidence is the most crucial ingredient for success. Once students pass that barrier, Chef Carmine believes that the rest — from French pastries to truffles to fondant cakes — comes naturally. Chef Carmine’s own careers, both military and culinary, are marked by instances of overcoming self-doubt to achieve success — with plenty of hard work and perseverance in between.

ICE Chef Carmine

Born in the Bronx to a Sicilian mother and Puerto Rican father, Carmine was exposed to two distinct cultures and cuisines throughout his childhood.

 

Keep reading to learn how Carmine went from the military to a successful pastry career in NYC kitchens, to guiding future chefs at ICE.

 

At ICE, we make it our mission to help students find their culinary voice — that creative drive within each of us that determines how we express ourselves through food. Whether it’s a career training program, a recreational course in pie crusts or a special event featuring handmade pasta, we’ll give you the tools to hone your culinary creativity. Join us as we ask some of today’s leading food industry pros to share their culinary voice.

 

Duff Goldman’s slogan is simple: If you can dream it, we can create it. Whether it’s a lifelike Betty White cake or a multi-tiered, hand-painted wedding cake (with or without lasers), the pastry chef and owner of the Baltimore-based, wildly popular Charm City Cakes bakery and star of Food Network’s Ace of Cakes is up for any confectionary challenge. We asked Duff to share his culinary voice with us, and his response should come as little surprise to anyone who’s seen his creations: “I really like to make people smile; I like to make them laugh; and I always like to make them think.” Watch the video and find out more about Duff Goldman’s culinary voice.

Duff Goldman

Watch extraordinary cake creator Duff Goldman reveal his culinary voice. 

 

By Bill Telepan, Director of Sustainability

 

In this interview, ICE’s Director of Sustainability Bill Telepan speaks with Chef April Bloomfield, the British-born, NYC-based chef behind The Spotted Pig, The Breslin and The John Dory Oyster Bar. Bill and April talk about Coombeshead Farm, the farm in the heart of Cornwall, England that April owns and runs with Chef Tom Adams, chef-owner of the London restaurant, Pitt Cue. Don’t let the name mislead you — Coombeshead is more ecosystem than farm, or more precisely, a farm, guesthouse, restaurant and bakery that runs largely off the fat of the land, and animals raised on that land. Bill and April chat about her first brush with farming, the benefits of producing your own food and the importance of getting dirty sometimes.

Chefs Tom Adams and April Bloomfield

 

Bill: Your food is so inspired by the seasons. When you came up with The Spotted Pig, what amazed me was how there were great ingredients in a casual setting and it felt so easy. I understand it was not easy, but it felt that way. I wanted to first ask you about growing up — did you have any experience with farming? What was food like at your home?

 

Read on to learn what inspired April to get growing.