A chef without a good knife is like a steak without salt — just plain wrong. According to ICE Chef Ted Siegel, a knife is the “singular most important piece of equipment that we use in the kitchen.” ICE and Wüsthof — a premier culinary school and a maker of expertly crafted knives — have been partners for more than 30 years, joining forces to prepare professional chefs and at-home cooks to work with more precision and confidence.

As any chef will tell you, knife skills are equally crucial. That’s why ICE and Wüsthof are combining over four decades of culinary technique and 200 years of craftsmanship to roll out a new video series: knife skills. From slicing and dicing to chiffonade, cake leveling, filleting fish, or finding the grain for the perfect steak, the beauty of expert craftsmanship and skilled chefs shines through — and the result is nothing less than culinary art.

Watch the trailer below for a sneak peek of the knife skills videos coming soon.

Ready to sharpen your culinary skills? Click here for more information on ICE’s career programs.

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The food industry agrees: ICE graduates enter the workplace with an edge. But what exactly is ICE’s recipe for success? We chatted with some of NYC’s top chefs and restaurateurs to find out. Scroll down to watch Marcus Samuelsson, Alex Guarnaschelli, Daniel Boulud, Danny Meyer and more praise ICE in the video below (plus: get a peek inside ICE’s facilities).

ICE’s light, airy facilities overlooking the Hudson River make it a unique and inspirational learning environment. Zac Young, ICE graduate and Pastry Director of Craveable Hospitality Group, said, “It’s completely state-of-the-art. It’s like no other culinary school that I’ve seen, in terms of the technology, the space, the layout…” Indeed, the space affects the energy of the entire ICE community. As Bill Telepan, Executive Chef of Oceana, observed, “You can just see everybody’s walking a little differently and moving a little quicker.”

ICE chef instructors share with students both technical expertise and the type of professional insight that can only be gained through years of experience. Said David Burke, restaurateur behind NYC mainstays like David Burke Kitchen, “The instructors at ICE are chefs that have worked in some of the greatest restaurants in the country, so they’re bringing that homegrown intensity to the students.” Innovators themselves, ICE chef instructors teach students the latest culinary techniques — offering truly forward-looking training. According to Michael White, chef and owner of the Altamarea Group, “There are so many new techniques in the kitchen, whether it’s sous vide cookery or immersion circulators — things that have not always been taught are now being taught at ICE.” Bill Telepan noted, “They’re doing a lot of the new molecular cooking; they’re expanding their horizons beyond the classics… The fusion of cuisines is much more refined than it was 20 years ago and they’re really looking at that.”

The real champions of ICE — who inspire us through their ambition, their curiosity and their tenacity — are the students. Marcus Samuelsson, restaurateur and chef of Harlem’s celebrated Red Rooster, said, “I love working with ICE graduates… They’re very passionate and determined because they very often left another field to come into culinary.” In the same vein, Alex Guarnaschelli, the culinary brains behind Butter and former ICE instructor, said, “When you get people that have life experience on top of starting a new career, then you get those layered and complex people that really enrich the food industry.” And you can be sure: ICE graduates hit the ground running. Said Marc Forgione (of the eponymous restaurant), “New York City is the city that never sleeps. It will chew you up and spit you out if you’re not ready for the pressure. Because they were trained in New York, [ICE graduates] don’t get too star struck when they get into a fast-paced kitchen.”

So when it comes time for hiring, what does the industry think about ICE graduates? As prominent restaurateur Danny Meyer aptly put it, “My sense about alumni of ICE is that they should all work for us instead of only some of them working for us.” The food industry loves working with ICE.

Ready to launch your culinary career with ICE? Click here to learn more about our career programs.

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Ever wanted to make fresh ravioli at home, but too intimidated to try? In a new video from ICE and PEOPLE magazine, ICE Chef Robert Ramsey shows how easy it can be with one simple trick, and shares an addictively delicious homemade ravioli recipe that confirms the adage that less truly can be more.

This recipe melds simple, straightforward ingredients into a flavorful, decadent dish. With just five ingredients, Chef Robert’s brown butter sage sauce is the perfect companion for his pillowy homemade ricotta ravioli.

Before you get started on your fresh egg pasta dough, here are a few tips from Chef Robert for nailing your homemade ravioli every time — you’ll never look at the store-bought stuff the same again:

  1. Using a ravioli tray is incredibly efficient and makes picture-perfect ravioli — but separating them can be tricky. “Flash” freezing them for 10-20 minutes in your freezer will make this step a snap, literally — you will know the ravioli are set once you can snap them apart easily, like a chocolate bar.
  2. Don’t have a ravioli tray? Just make the ravioli the same way, laying out a sheet twice as long as you need, piping the filling equal distance apart, folding the second half of the dough over the first, and then cutting with a ravioli wheel or knife. (That said, a ravioli tray costs the same as a wheel, and it’s easier to use. You can find one here.)
  3. When cooking the ravioli, you can tell they’re ready when they puff up like a balloon — this means that the filling is hot enough to create steam.
  4. Remember to reserve some of the pasta water for your sauce. Because of the starch in the pasta water, adding a spoonful of the cooking water will make the sauce “creamy” without adding cream. But be careful not to add too much as the pasta water is already salty.
  5. If you’re looking for other sauces to substitute, try these combinations: tomato sauce, oregano and Parmesan; classic pesto with a sprinkle of pine nuts; or capers, olive oil, lemon zest and parsley.

Ricotta Ravioli With Brown Butter, Sage and Hazelnuts
Servings: makes about 4 servings

Ingredients:

For the pasta

1 recipe for Pasta All’Uovo recipe (below)

For the filling

Ingredients:

2 cups ricotta cheese
1 tablespoon heavy cream
1 egg
1 egg yolk
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
¼ teaspoon grated nutmeg
¼ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon pepper

For the sauce

4 ounces (1 stick) butter
1 bunch fresh sage, leaves picked
6 ounces hazelnuts, toasted and chopped
¼ teaspoon salt
2 ounces grated Parmesan cheese

Preparation:

For the filling

  • Combine all ingredients in the work bowl of a stand mixer or a large mixing bowl. With the whisk attachment or hand whisk, whip the mixture until completely smooth.
  • Transfer to a piping bag and reserve in the refrigerator until ready to fill pasta.

To assemble ravioli

  • Once your pasta sheets are rolled out (after the final step in the dough recipe below), you can begin assembling the raviolis. Place one pasta sheet onto a well-floured ravioli tray. (Don’t have a ravioli tray? See Chef Robert’s tip above.) Using your hands, gently press the dough into the divots in the tray. Pipe about two tablespoons of filling onto each sheet of dough. Next, brush a second sheet of dough with cold water and place the wet side down on top of the bottom ravioli sheet.
  • Use a rolling pin, roll over the raviolis back and forth to seal and crimp the raviolis. Flip the ravioli tray to unfold the finished pasta. Transfer to a floured sheet pan and place immediately in the freezer.

For the sauce

  • In a small pot over medium heat, melt the butter, swirling constantly. When it begins to bubble and sizzle, keep swirling and watch carefully for browning. As soon as the butter turns golden brown and smells nutty, carefully add the sage leaves and remove from heat. The sage will fry in the butter, making it crispy and aromatic. Finally, add the chopped hazelnuts and the salt. Reserve the sauce in a warm place until you’re ready to serve the pasta (do not refrigerate).

To assemble the dish

  • Bring a large pot of water to a full, rolling boil. Add about ¼ cup of salt per quart of water. (Adequately salted water should taste like seawater.)
  • Remove the ravioli from the freezer. Break the raviolis apart and carefully place them into the boiling water and cook 4-5 minutes, until tender but not mushy.
  • Remove and toss directly into the pot of butter sauce. Gently mix to coat, and then spoon into a large pasta bowl. Finish with a sprinkle of Parmesan cheese and an extra touch of chopped, fried sage, if desired. 

Pasta all’ Uovo (Fresh Egg Pasta)
Servings: makes about 4 servings

Ingredients:

11 ounces of all-purpose flour
3 large eggs, at room temperature
1 teaspoon salt

Preparation:

  1. Place the flour on your work surface and make a well in the center.
  2. Break the eggs into the well and add the salt. With a fork, begin to gently beat the eggs in a circular motion, incorporating approximately ½ of the flour.
  3. Using a bench scraper, bring the entire mixture together.
  4. Knead the dough with your hands for 3 to 4 minutes. At this stage, the dough should be soft and pliable. If bits of dried dough form (which is normal) don’t incorporate them into the dough — brush them off of your work surface.
  5. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and let it rest at room temperature for 20 minutes.
  6. Cut the dough into four pieces and recover with the plastic wrap to prevent a skin from forming.
  7. Remove one piece of the dough at a time from the plastic wrap and knead through the rollers of a pasta machine set at the widest setting. Fold the dough like a business letter to form three layers, pressing out all of the air. Turn the open end of the dough to the right (like a book) and repeat the rolling process. Continue the folding and rolling process five times on this setting.
  8. Repeat the folding and rolling process for the three remaining pieces of dough.
  9. Roll a piece of the previously kneaded dough through the pasta machine, reducing the setting with each roll until reaching the fifth-narrowest setting. Do not fold the dough between each setting.
  10. Once the sheets of pasta have been rolled out, use immediately, keeping the remaining sheets covered with a kitchen towel until ready to use.

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Alternative flours — like chickpea flour, banana flour and grapeseed flour — can add a nutritional kick and a tasty nuance to many everyday recipes. Though substituting your tried-and-true AP flour may seem a little intimidating at first, once you have a few recipes under your belt you can add these alternative flours to your regular cooking and baking repertoire. To help you get there, Chef Sarah Chaminade is sharing three new recipes that she developed for ICE and Direct Eats using alternative flours. First, Chef Sarah uses chickpea flour to add a sweet and creamy texture to her chickpea canapés. Then, Chef Sarah demonstrates how to make a gluten-free angel food cake using banana flour —with all of the lightness and none of the gluten. Then, she uses merlot grapeseed flour in her chocolate chip cookies to create a gluten-free and vegan take on the classic recipe. Watch the video below, and then scroll to get the recipes.

Chickpea Canapé
Servings: three to four dozen individual canapés, depending on the size of each

In Liguria, the region flanking Genoa along Italy’s northwest coast, farinata is a classic dish. Farinata is a thin chickpea cake typically cooked in a wood-burning oven. In Liguria, bake shops put signs in their windows announcing the time that the farinata will be ready and customers line up to buy it. It’s a perfect snack when eaten like a piece of pizza on waxed butcher paper. Farinata, just like pizza, can be stuffed or garnished with any vegetable, cheese or sauce.

Ingredients:

3 cups chickpea flour
5 cups chicken stock, vegetable stock or water
1 clove garlic, minced
1 teaspoon thyme, chopped
1 teaspoon rosemary, chopped
1 teaspoon oregano, chopped
¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
½ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon black pepper
Optional garnish: dollop of creme fraîche, crispy prosciutto or micro herbs like micro arugula

Preparation:

  • Preheat convection oven to 450 °F (or 475 °F for a conventional home oven).
  • Combine chickpea flour and water with whisk until smooth — let sit for 1 hour to allow batter to thicken slightly.
  • Stir in remaining ingredients.
  • Pour the batter onto a silicone baking mat or a baking sheet lined with parchment. Spread evenly with spatula and bake for 30-40 minutes until golden brown.
  • Use a knife or pizza cutter to cut farinata into squares (5×7 or 6×8, depending on the size you prefer) and top with optional garnish.

* Recipe adapted from Ciao Italia by Mary Ann Esposito

Gluten-Free Banana Flour Angel Food Cake
Yield: one cake

1 10-inch angel food cake pan with removable bottom
15 egg whites, room temperature (note: it’s essential that they are at room temperature!)
1 pinch of salt
½ cup plus ¾ cup coconut sugar
1½ cups banana flour
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
1 vanilla bean
* Flavor variations:
Replace vanilla with zest of one lemon, two limes or half an orange, or replace vanilla with two teaspoons of cinnamon

Preparation:

  • Preheat oven to 350 °F.
  • In a very clean, dry mixing bowl combine egg whites and salt and whip to soft peaks. Gradually add ½ cup of coconut sugar. Continue to whip egg whites to medium peaks, being careful to not over whip.
  • In a separate bowl, sift together the remaining coconut sugar and banana flour.
  • Gradually sift dry ingredients into the whipped whites, folding gently to be careful not to deflate.
  • Fold in vanilla extract and vanilla bean.
  • Pour batter into an ungreased angel food pan, spreading carefully to distribute batter evenly — do not bang the cake pan, as this will cause the batter to deflate.
  • Bake for 50 min, or until golden brown and cake springs back when lightly touched.
  • Remove from oven and invert onto a cooling rack without removing the mold.
  • Allow the cake to cool completely before unmolding.

Vegan, Gluten-Free Merlot Grapeseed Flour Chocolate Chip Cookies
Yield: one dozen cookies

2 ½ cups almond flour
¼ cup merlot grapeseed flour
½ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon baking powder
½ cup coconut oil
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
½ cup agave
1 cup 72% bittersweet chocolate, chopped

Preparation:

  • Preheat oven to 325 °F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  • Melt the coconut oil in microwave or on stove top. In a medium bowl, combine all wet ingredients.
  • In a separate bowl, whisk together the dry ingredients.
  • Pour the wet ingredients over the dry ingredients, mixing with a rubber spatula or spoon to combine.
  • Stir in the chocolate chunks, and allow the mixture to chill in refrigerator at least 30 minutes.
  • Using a cookie scoop, scoop mixture onto your prepared baking sheet and bake for 15 minutes.
  • Let cool before enjoying. Because these cookies stay nice and moist, they taste great the next day too.

Master culinary or pastry arts with ICE’s expert chef instructors — click here for information on our career programs.

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If you haven’t added cardamom, za’atar and berbere spice to your pantry, you’re doing it wrong. These unique, flavor-packed spices can turn an ordinary dish into something extraordinary (and delicious). In a new video from ICE and Direct Eats, Chef James Briscione shares a few recipe ideas that will be sure to excite your palate and inspire your own spice exploration: Berbere Roasted Chicken Pizza with Berbere BBQ Sauce; Roasted Sweet Potatoes With Za’atar and Sumac-Yogurt Dressing; and Cardamom Roasted Pork Tenderloin. Watch the video to learn how you can prepare these dishes at home.

Berbere Roasted Chicken Pizza and Berbere BBQ Sauce
Makes two (8″-10″) round pizzas

For the pizza dough
Yield: makes two (8″-10″) round pizzas or one (18×13) pan pizza (full-size baking sheet)

Ingredients:

1¼ cups lukewarm water (100° F)
1 packet (2½ teaspoons) dry active yeast
1 teaspoon salt
¼ cup whole-wheat flour
3 cups high-gluten flour (bread flour)
3 tablespoons olive oil

Preparation:

  • Combine water and yeast in a small bowl and whisk to dissolve.
  • In the bowl of an electric mixer, combine the salt, flours and olive oil, and mix well. With the mixer running, add the water and yeast to the bowl. Mix on low for two minutes, then turn to medium and mix three to four minutes more, or until the mixture forms a smooth ball.
  • Transfer the dough to a large bowl that has been lightly greased with olive oil. Cover with plastic wrap or a clean kitchen towel and set aside on the countertop for 45 minutes.
  • Remove the dough from the bowl to a floured work surface. Punch the dough down by flouring your hands, making a fist and pressing the air out of the dough. Divide dough into two pieces. Roll the two pieces into balls under the palm of your hand. Then roll each ball into a flat disc with a rolling pin. Gently stretch the dough by hand until it’s between 1/8- to 1/4-inch thick.
  • Dough can be reserved in tightly wrapped plastic and refrigerated for up to three days.

For the berbere BBQ sauce

Ingredients:
¼ cup brown sugar
¼ cider vinegar
1 tablespoon berbere spice

Preparation:

  • In a medium bowl, combine ingredients and whisk until evenly mixed. Reserve for preparing the pizza.

For the berbere roasted chicken

Ingredients:

1 tablespoon berbere spice
2 teaspoons kosher salt, plus more to taste
½ teaspoon sugar
2 3½- to 5-pound whole chickens (“roaster” size)
Olive or vegetable oil, as needed
1 28-ounce can chopped tomatoes
6 garlic cloves, chopped
2 cups minced yellow onions

Preparation:

  • Preheat the oven to 375° F.
  • To make the seasoning mixture, combine the berbere spice, salt and sugar in a small bowl and mix well.
  • Lightly coat the chickens with oil, then sprinkle generously with the seasoning mixture.
  • Combine the tomatoes, garlic and onions in a large roasting pan and place the two chickens on top, breast-side up. Roast for about 45 minutes or until an instant-read thermometer inserted in the thigh registers 160° F (as the chicken rests, the temperature will rise to 165° F). Transfer the chicken to a large carving board to rest. When chicken cools slightly, use your hands and a fork to shred chicken.
  • In a medium pot, combine the brown sugar and vinegar. Bring the mixture to a simmer over medium heat. Once the sugar is dissolved, simmer five minutes to reduce the liquid by approximately half. Add the tomato mixture from the roasting pan to pot and simmer 10 minutes more. Add the berbere spice and purée with a hand blender or transfer to a blender to process until smooth. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

To prepare the pizza

  • Preheat oven to 500 °F (or as high as your oven temperature goes).
  • Spread a base of berbere BBQ sauce over stretched pizza dough.
  • Top with shredded chicken, mozzarella and cheddar cheese.
  • Bake for six to eight minutes or until cheese is melted and crust is golden brown. Remove pizza from oven and let it cool for two to three minutes. Top pizza with dressed arugula and serve.
  • Repeat with remaining dough.
berbere spice pizza

Berbere Roasted Chicken Pizza and Berbere BBQ Sauce

za'atar roasted sweet potatoes

Roasted Sweet Potatoes With Za’atar and Sumac-Yogurt Dressing

Roasted Sweet Potatoes With Za’atar and Sumac-Yogurt Dressing
Makes four to six servings

Ingredients:

4 medium sweet potatoes (about 3 pounds)
2 medium red onions, cut into wedges
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon kosher salt
freshly ground pepper
2 tablespoons za’atar
toasted walnuts for garnish

Preparation:

  • Preheat oven to 450° F. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil.
  • Wash and peel sweet potatoes, and cut lengthwise into wedges. Peel and cut red onions into wedges. Transfer ingredients into a bowl. Drizzle with olive oil, kosher salt, crushed black pepper, za’atar and gently toss to evenly distribute. Transfer onto your prepared baking sheet and bake for 35 to 40 minutes, until browned on the edges and tender inside (pierce one piece with a fork to test).

For the sumac dressing

Ingredients:
1 garlic clove, peeled and smashed
juice and zest of 1 lemon
2 teaspoons sumac
1 tablespoon chopped mint leaves
1 cup full-fat greek yogurt
kosher salt and freshly ground pepper, as needed.

Preparation:

  • Combine all ingredients in a bowl. Mix well and season to taste with salt and pepper. 
cardamom pork tenderloin

Cardamom Roasted Pork Tenderloin

Cardamom Roasted Pork Tenderloin
Makes four servings

Ingredients:

1 pork tenderloin, fat trimmed
4 garlic cloves, skin on
6 branches fresh thyme
3-4 whole cardamom pods
2 tablespoons butter
kosher salt
freshly ground black pepper
canola oil, as needed

Preparation:

  • Season the pork with salt and pepper. Place a large sauté pan over medium heat and add a thin film of canola oil. Allow the oil to heat for three minutes before adding the meat.
  • Pat the pork dry and place in the pan skin-side down. Without moving or flipping the pork, let cook until the first side is well browned. Turn and cook until browned on each side. Maintain the heat carefully: If the edges of the pan begin to smoke, reduce heat.
  • Add the garlic cloves, thyme and cardamom. Roll the meat around to expose all sides to the aromatics. Turn the heat to low and add the butter. Using a spoon, swirl the butter around the pan and baste the pork with butter as the aromatics infuse in the mixture. Continue basting and turning the meat until it reaches an internal temperature of 150˚F.
  • Remove the meat to rack to rest. The temperature should rise to 155˚F before serving. Slice and serve.

Want to study the culinary arts with Chef James? Click here to learn about ICE’s career programs.

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