For 15 years, Kelly Newsome (Culinary Arts ’17) dreamed of going to culinary school. Though her infatuation with food and cooking was sparked during college, various factors (like concerns from family and friends) pushed her off that track and into office jobs. It’s not an uncommon situation, but what set Kelly apart was her tenacity — it drove her to take small steps toward achieving her ultimate goal. First, she enrolled at New York University’s master’s program in food studies and spent three years working full-time while burning the midnight oil between classes and assignments. Then, she landed an attractive marketing position with a food science company, edging ever closer to the kitchen. Finally, at age 38, Kelly decided she couldn’t ignore her true passion any longer, and enrolled in ICE’s Culinary Arts program. “I just realized I’m never going to be happy unless I follow this passion inside me, which is to work in food.”

Why culinary school, instead of diving directly into the kitchen? Kelly explained, “I don’t have the luxury of working my way up in a kitchen at this stage in my life. So going to culinary school will certainly give me confidence when I walk into the kitchen for the first time.”

Want to gain kitchen confidence of your own? Click here to learn more about our Culinary Arts career training program.

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By Danielle Page

Pursuing an education in culinary arts opens a ton of doors for potential career opportunities — far beyond the traditional roles confined to a kitchen. A few decades ago, working in food media meant only a handful of paths to consider: authoring cookbooks or editing food magazines, with not many other options in between. But thanks to social media and the age of the internet, culinary expertise can be translated into a wide array of viable career options — as demonstrated by these ICE graduates who have gone on to do just that.

From styling food for avant-garde startups to founding a media company dedicated to culinary video production, these ICE graduates are making big strides. Here’s what they had to say about leveraging culinary training to land a job in the media world.

Eden Grinshpan

Photo courtesy of edeneats.com

1. Eden Grinshpan, Food TV Personality

Having been the host of two cooking shows on a major TV network, Eden Grinshpan is proof that networking will get you pretty much anywhere. “Through ICE, I was introduced to many people in the field that have helped me along the way with my career,” Grinshpan says. “Since leaving ICE I have worked on ‘Eden Eats,’ a show that I created with my business partner Samantha Schutz, and ‘Log On And Eat with Eden.’ I had such a great time in the program [at ICE]. I met so many people from all walks of life that were just as passionate as I was about food and the culinary industry. The school gave me a great platform to learn about the service industry and also allowed me to network and meet great people in the industry. Since graduating from ICE, I have been able to pursue my dream of food television and I am very fortunate to the Cooking Channel for taking me under their wing and believing in me and my shows.”

Julie with husband and co-founder Dan (credit: Lindsay Morris)

2. Julie Resnick: Founder of feedfeed

What happens when a former digital marketer turned ICE graduate has an excess of produce from her CSA to prepare? She takes to social media for inspiration — and ends up building a following of over one million in the process. “I began by posting pictures of my own food and then asked people to share what they were making by also tagging their food with #feedfeed,” says Resnick. “That started to develop a community of people who were cooking the way I was. I would do a search for sweet potatoes and find some really cool sweet potato dishes, and I would follow those people and engage with them and comment on their posts. Then I would say, “Hey, by the way, don’t forget to add #feedfeed to what you’re cooking and that way we can all share with each other.” It was my need that was driving it. It took off from there.” Of course, curating a hit Instagram account isn’t going to happen overnight. But if you’re looking to start cultivating a following, Resnick does have a few words of advice to share. “First, I would say that it’s important to be active on social,” she says. “Don’t just spend time composing a beautiful, well-lit shot, posting it and then logging out of Instagram or whatever social media platform you’re using. Spend the time looking at what people you follow are posting, like the content and comment on the content. I think there’s also this perception that you shouldn’t be following too many people — I disagree with that. If there are people out there who are putting out nice content that you’re interested in, follow them, engage with them and get to know the people behind these accounts. Read what these people are writing, don’t just look at the pictures. It’s about relationship building.”

ICE alumni Jamie Tiampo of SeeFood Media3. Jamie Tiampo, President and Founder of SeeFood Media

Jamie Tiampo is the founder of a company that fills a niche in which it has no real competitor: a “one-stop shop” featuring seven kitchen sets, a rooftop for outdoor cooking segments, separate prep kitchens for food stylists, an in-house prop shop and a team of seasoned professionals who have produced several hundred food-centric video and photo shoots. “I started with the fundamental question of how to make food look better,” says Tiampo. “From there, it was a matter of engineering the systems and facilities from the ground up to support that mission. If there was one thing I learned from living through the first dot-com bubble, it was that nothing is sacred. SeeFood Media started in an era of big TV cooking shows with custom sets in gigantic studios. Yet we’ve witnessed—and benefitted from—an evolution where food brands have realized they can also leverage digital video, and hire us to script, produce and edit extremely high quality videos which speak directly to their consumers,” Jamie explains. “What drives our business is bandwidth. Today, people can watch a video on their phone while they walk down the sidewalk. For brands, that means video content can reach an audience anytime, anywhere.”

 

Kim O'Donnel - Food Writer - Interview4. Kim O’Donnel, Cookbook Author and Food Journalist

“I worked as a reporter for about five years before exploring a culinary career,” says O’Donnel. “Once I realized I wanted to work in food, I pursued a job under James Beard Award winner Ann Cashion in Washington, D.C. It was in the days of pre-internet communication, so I typed her a note (on an electric typewriter) asking about openings at Cashion’s Eat Place for rookies, like myself, who wanted to learn. Ann came to be one of my mentors, and what I learned on the job in just five months really set me up for culinary school.” Since attending ICE, O’Donnel has become one of the country’s most respected food writers, celebrated by the M.F.K. Fisher Award for Excellence in Culinary Writing and serving on the James Beard Foundation’s Journalism Awards Committee. “My newly released cookbook, PNW Veg: 100 Vegetable Recipes Inspired by the Local Bounty of the Pacific Northwest is my third over the past seven years,” says O’Donnel. “I’ve made a name for myself as an omnivore writing vegetarian cookbooks, inspiring folks like myself to make more room for plants. But there’s other news as well: I’m the chef-in-residence at a Seattle branch of the YMCA, overseeing programming for its new Healthy Living Kitchen. I’m rolling out Meatless Monday demos, and the branch will be a CSA pick-up spot this summer. Additionally, I’m going to Houston in July as a returning volunteer chef with Culinary Corps — my first trip with CC was to New Orleans in 2007.”

Jiselle Basile5. Jiselle Basile, Chef and Food Stylist, Extra Crispy

Traditionally, food stylists are utilized in the commercial or magazine world. But thanks to the wide world of startups, there’s a need for food stylists beyond the fold — like at Extra Crispy, a website dedicated entirely to breakfast. “There’s not a typical day, which keeps it interesting,” says Basile. “At Extra Crispy, there’s a startup mentality — within a major company — but it’s still a startup. Most of us take on a lot of different roles so no two days are similar. Usually I’m either researching recipes at my desk, or I can be at a video shoot with a chef, or testing and styling in the kitchen. Tomorrow, I’m going to be making Scotch eggs with an ostrich egg on Facebook Live. I have to pick up ostrich eggs at Union Square Market at 8:00 a.m., so I’ll start here whenever I get back.” As far as the current food media landscape goes, Basile says there’s a major shift happening. “The whole foodie culture thing is having an impact,” she says. “People are either talking about things more than ever or social media is having an impact and brought to life how much people talk about it. People are more aware of their food. I’ve seen restaurants focusing more on where their food is coming from and I guess it’s in part because people are so concerned about the surrounding issues. It’s interesting how owners and chefs now look at how social media affects their restaurants. Nowadays a lot of people, before they set foot in your restaurant, will see if you have an Instagram and check out what your food looks like, which has a huge impact on whether someone will eat in your restaurant.”

Ed Behr - Natalie Stultz - Interview

Photo Credit: Natalie Stultz

6. Ed Behr, Founder and Publisher of The Art of Eating

Ed Behr had quite the journey to where he is now — heading up the respected quarterly journal, The Art of Eating, which he created. “I was working as a carpenter and builder, which I did for about a dozen years,” he says. “I decided I wanted to open a restaurant, and to do that I felt I had to go to cooking school, not because I wanted to cook in the restaurant, but because I knew I didn’t know enough to recognize and hire a good chef. In the end, I never opened a restaurant. Since 1986, I’ve been writing about food and wine as the editor and publisher of The Art of Eating.” Behr earned one of the food industry’s most prestigious honors: an induction into the James Beard Foundation’s “Who’s Who of Food and Beverage in America” in 2015. But he’s more than humble about the work he’s doing. “Like so many other people, I spend most of my time looking at a computer screen,” he says. “I try—but rarely succeed—to devote the morning to my own writing. My days are a mix of editing, writing and emailing (writers, editors, photographers, illustrators and people who can help with research). Actual interviews, in which I might quote someone, I normally do over the phone or in person. Now and then I look up something in an ink-on-paper book, as most of what I want to know is still not anywhere online. I also spend a fair amount of time on the nuts and bolts of publishing.”

Sara Deseran7. Sara Deseran, Director of Marketing and Branding for Tacolicious

“After some 20 years of working as a food writer, I’m now the marketing and branding director for Tacolicious, a restaurant group my husband Joe Hargrave and I own,” says Deseran. “We have five restaurants in the Bay Area, plus a cantina called Bar San Pancho and a tequila bar called Mosto. We started as a little market stand at the Ferry Plaza Farmers Market in 2009. As someone who’s written cookbooks, done food styling, food writing and even worked in restaurants in the kitchen way back in the day (and pretty much sucked at my job as a prep cook), this job allows me to kind of do it all. Barring straight operations, I do a lot of everything. It’s also given me a lot of humility in regards to how unbelievably hard it is to run restaurants! Every day there are about 10 fires to put out. I’d tell students to immerse themselves in different elements of the food industry, but veer towards your strengths rather than your dreamy ideas of being that big name chef. Not everyone is cut out to work in a kitchen (like me, for instance). It took me catering, cooking, serving, writing, styling, hard work, plus an element of luck to get where I am now. Figuring out what you’re truly good at is empowering. There are a million ways to get into food.”

Think a career in food media is right for you? Click here to learn about ICE’s career programs and get started today.

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By Andrea Strong

She’s been an accountant, a model, a caterer, a chef, a reality TV competitor and most recently a cookbook author, a restaurateur and a co-host of ABC’s Emmy award-winning, popular lifestyle series “The Chew.” She is Carla Hall, the fan favorite competitor on Bravo’s “Top Chef” and “Top Chef: All Stars.” Classically trained in France, but true to her Nashville roots, Carla is a culinary Wonder Woman who’s worked nearly every nook of this business with enthusiasm and a healthy dose of hootie hoo!

Andrea Strong spoke to Carla about changing careers, the need to feel frustration, the reasons she temporarily closed her Brooklyn restaurant Carla Hall’s Southern Kitchen and why social media is a double-edged sword.

Andrea Strong: You started out as an accountant, then became a model and then ditched it all to become a caterer. Can you talk a bit about these decisions and how they played out?

Carla Hall: I think it’s important to say that from the beginning, I had parents and grandparents who said to me, “It’s your job to be happy, not to be rich.” So I was always looking for satisfaction. Having the support of my family made it that much easier to make the transitions I made.

Carla HallThat said, I really hated my job as an accountant. I was doing some modeling on the side, and I met some girls going to Paris, and I went. I had no interest in food at the time, but living in Paris changed that. I would go to these Sunday brunches with models and some ex-pats and that’s where my interest in food came from. Being at these communal meals, it felt like my grandma’s Sunday suppers. And it was just this feeling that I had missed so much. I became curious about what was happening in the kitchen and about the garden and how all that got to the table. I started cooking for the people I was staying with and buying cookbooks.

So it started out as a hobby? When did you have that moment where you knew it was going to be your career?

I was in Paris for a few years, then I was in London and then I went home to the States where I started a lunch delivery service, really as a fluke. I had done a baby shower for my sister and made all this food. A friend of mine could not make it to the shower, and I promised her that I’d bring her the leftovers. But then my brother-in-law ate them all! So I went home and re-made all the food and packed it all up in a picnic basket, which is all I really had to transport it, and brought it to my friend the next day at lunchtime. She worked at a doctor’s office and when I got there and opened up the basket, my friend said to her co-workers, this is my friend Carla and she has a lunch business. And I was kind of shocked. I was like what? And then I said “Sure, yeah, it’s the Lunch Basket!” I had to make up prices right then and there. Then they said great, can you do this for us every day because there’s no place to eat around here. And I did. I went door to door to barber shops, and other small local businesses and slowly built up to 14 clients. I found myself doing it for five years.

To think that if you had just called up your friend and said, sorry, my brother-in-law ate all the leftovers, so I won’t be bringing you lunch tomorrow, you may never have started your catering business!

Well, my word is my bond, and when I say something I keep a promise. When people see you on TV they don’t realize that you started somewhere. I worked like crazy every day, not one day off, for five years. I delivered food in a bassinet on the bus! Finally I bought an old mail truck to make my deliveries. I was working it.

When did you decide to go to culinary school?

After five years, I turned 30 and I felt I had the practical training from my own business but I wanted the theory and the classical training. I knew I needed culinary school for that. 

You’ve worn so many hats within the food industry — caterer, author, television personality. What made you want to open a restaurant?

I never wanted to open a restaurant, but my business partner thought it would be a great idea. I was telling him no for the longest time. Then he said come see this space, and when I saw it, I got this feeling of what I could do, which would be like a meat plus three, but with Nashville hot chicken. I had a vision then. I felt it. It was like a perfect storm: I saw a space and I got that feeling that I was meant to do it. I am all about the gut and my feeling, it doesn’t make it any easier, but at least I feel like I am on the right path. It’s incredibly hard to run a restaurant, and I know most don’t succeed but I did feel I was meant to do this.

You opened in June 2016 and you recently closed to “retool”? Why?  

You really don’t know how hard it is to open and run a restaurant until you do it. I have never been that tired in all my life, but there was also a great sense of satisfaction and happiness and that is what I always check into and make sure is there. The food and concept was fine but the staffing became a major issue. My general manager moved on and things started to fall apart. That is one of the most challenging parts of running a small business like a restaurant. One night we had this huge party and a few people called out, and it was me doing it all. I was bartender, I was server, I was doing dishes. I was like hold up, I am not meant to do all of this. And then more people were calling out. So I just shut it down. It was hard to close to retool but I felt like there were so many cracks behind the scenes and they were really starting to show. I felt it would be harder to build my reputation from mediocrity than shut it down. I didn’t care if they said my restaurant failed, I cared about my reputation and putting out a good product and to have people be excited about it. If you’re gonna eat my food, you’re gonna love it and have a great experience. We are working it out and I hope to reopen by July.

Carla Hall

I read that you used Kickstarter to open your restaurant. What was that experience like? Would you recommend it for other aspiring restaurateurs?

We raised about $262,000 on Kickstarter and it cost $1.1 million to build out and open the restaurant. I think Kickstarter was great to let the world know I was doing this project. It was a kind of hello, here we are! The challenge is that I did it to announce the intention of the restaurant, but it was still a year and a half before the project was ready and people didn’t understand why it was taking so long. I think that it’s hard for a “celebrity” to do it because even though you have the same financial restraints as someone else, the assumption is that you have money. Also with Kickstarter you have to give people something of value, like dinners or books, and so you are really giving back a lot at the end of the day.

However, it’s great way to fund a project. The thing I would recommend is to build your social media presence prior to your Kickstarter otherwise you are preaching to a void. You need the volume, you need a big community to preach to, and I don’t think people realize that. But it’s a hugely successful thing to do if you are in a small community who wants to support you to build it.

I am sure the road from accounting to opening Carla Hall’s Southern Kitchen has not always been smooth. How do you deal with frustration and continue moving forward?

My feeling has always been that if you are frustrated enough you will move forward. It’s the thing that makes you work, especially for me. There are times I feel like I am beating my head against the wall, and at those points I either say I can get behind it and work it through or find out that I have to change course, but you can’t stand still. You are supposed to move in some direction. You have to get mad. You hear these stories of a mother who lifts a car off her son. Well, frustration is a form of fear that can force you to move and to see things and make a change.

Do you feel as though you have developed a culinary voice, and is it important as a chef or personality (or both) to have one?

I didn’t start out thinking, I am going to have this “voice,” but because of “Top Chef,” I do. People stop me in the street and they say, when I see you I get hungry, and people think of comfort food when they think of me. That is what my restaurant is built on and that’s because of who I am. My goal is to recreate the joy of going to my grandmother’s house. I think as you build your career, it’s important to have a point of view. When people are in the mood for a particular type of food, then you fill it. That doesn’t mean you can’t change occasionally, but it’s nice for people to know what to expect. I have done braised pork with plantains and ginger and people are like, where’s the fried chicken, but it’s still comfort food.

What are your thoughts on food media and culture?

Insert eye roll! I mean all that food on Instagram that makes people an influencer? Everyone’s a critic and everyone thinks they know food. But on the other side, and the good side, chefs can push the envelope more because people want to be eating more interesting foods, they are more adventurous. The other good thing is that important issues around food, food insecurity and food waste can be spotlighted on social media. But when you can’t eat your food because you are too busy taking a picture, not so good.

Any advice for students interested in pursuing careers in food media?

I think food media is a great thing. There are all these new careers popping up, because of food and how popular it is. And forward-thinking culinary schools like ICE offer great classes in food media in these small intimate settings that make it easier to move from one discipline to another. I’d say take one of these classes, network a lot and find your way in.

Ready to launch a dynamic career in the culinary arts? Click here for more information on ICE’s career programs.

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What aspiring baker hasn’t admired Martha Stewart’s meticulously crafted desserts and dishes—or dreamed of exploring her farm and studio spaces? Three ICE students recently had the pleasure to experience both when they were invited to join Martha in her kitchen for a special episode of Martha Bakes. Now in its sixth season, Martha Bakes is an Emmy®-nominated teaching show on PBS filmed on location at her farm in Bedford, NY.

ICE Students join Martha Stewart for an episode of Martha Bakes | Institute of Culinary Education

Amy Simidian (left), Gina Ansaldo (center) and Denise Flores (right) make frangipane with Martha Stewart on the set of Martha Bakes.

Each episode of the show introduces viewers to a new baking tip or technique. “The sixth season of the show is particularly special to me, with talented culinary students joining me on each episode,” said Martha. “Every season is meant to inspire and educate, and the sixth season has even more of my favorite recipes and techniques.”

ICE students Gina Ansaldo, Amy Simidian and Denise Flores stepped on set to help Martha prepare various types of frangipane, a sweet nut cream found in many popular baked goods, to fill different recipes such as coffee cake, an apricot tart, a classic English bakewell tart and Bostock, a well-loved French pastry.

But the real lessons came from beyond the kitchen. Says Gina, “My experience with Martha was priceless. [She] taught us that hard work pays off and no goal is impossible to reach. She had an incredible farm, multiple chicken coops, several test kitchens for filming and an amazing team that works with her every day. Seeing that has taught me that if you push yourself and work for what you want, you can obtain your goals and aspirations. It was definitely a day I will never forget.”

Learn more about opportunities to work alongside culinary luminaries and network at ICE. Click here to get information about our School of Pastry & Baking Arts.

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By Carly DeFilippo

From 17-year-old high school grads to former doctors, artists and executives, ICE students come from all walks of life. In the case of Brooklyn native Christian Souvenir, it took many years in the military before the desire to attend culinary school took hold.

The switch from government intelligence work to cooking may seem like a drastic change, but Christian’s disciplined background is serving him well in the kitchen. Since graduating from ICE’s Culinary Arts program in 2011, he has worked in some of Brooklyn’s most innovative new restaurants, including Nightingale 9 and French Louie, growing his love for a new kind of service.

Thanks to ICE’s flexible scheduling options, Christian is able to continue kitchen work while pursuing a second ICE diploma in Culinary Management. “I love cooking in restaurants,” Christian explains. “But I saw myself on this path where I could potentially be in charge of people and not have the tools to help them get better. What I’ve learned in management is helping me form what I want in my eventual restaurant, and what I want for myself as a leader. That is so important.”

To learn how ICE’s Culinary Management program prepares grads to own or operate culinary businesses, click here. For more information about the range of active duty, reserve and veteran’s benefits available to ICE students, click here.

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