The James Beard Awards Semifinalists have been announced and we’re thrilled to share that a number of ICE alumni were included on the list. Donned as the “Oscars” of the food world, the James Beard Awards are one of the highest honors for food and beverage professionals in the United States. They’re also an opportunity for the industry to take a moment to recognize the hard work and achievements of those who push the mold and continue to make America’s culinary environment the dynamic, inspiring place it is today.

James Beard Awards

Here are the ICE alums named 2018 James Beard Award Semifinalists:

Outstanding Restaurateur

  • Zoe Nathan (Culinary ’01), Rustic Canyon Group, Santa Monica, CA

Best Chef: NYC

  • Missy Robbins (Culinary ’95), Lilia, Brooklyn, NY
  • Ann Redding (Culinary ’02), Uncle Boons, New York, NY

Best Chef: Northwest

  • Rachel Yang (Culinary ’01), Joule, Seattle

Best Chef: Southeast

  • Mashama Bailey (Culinary ’01), The Grey, Savannah, GA
  • Vivian Howard (Culinary ’03), Chef & The Farmer, Kinston, NC

 

Honored by Association

We were excited to learn that Kismet, the casual all-day Los Angeles restaurant known for inventive, veggie-forward dishes, was named as a semifinalist in the Best New Restaurant category. ICE alum Meadow Ramsey (Pastry ’02), who previously led the kitchen at LA hotspot Sqrl, heads Kismet’s pastry kitchen. Her pastry kitchen prowess no doubt contributed to Kismet’s honor.

Launch your culinary or hospitality career with ICE — learn more

 

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By Caitlin Raux

There are several good reasons why Greg Proechel (Culinary Arts ’10), Executive Chef of Ferris, has an octopus tattooed on his right arm. For starters, the former college football player has an octopus-like dexterity in the kitchen, a skill that earned him the nickname “pulpo,” — that’s “octopus” in Spanish — from famed Spanish chef Jesus Nuñez, whom he accompanied on Iron Chef in, coincidentally, the octopus battle. The eight-armed mollusk, which can grow an arm if it loses one, is a symbol of regeneration, a theme that resonates with Greg. Less than a decade ago, he was working a desk job as a financial analyst. Today, he’s leading a new restaurant that’s already garnered praise from the New York Times, the New Yorker, and was named one of Eater’s Hottest Restaurants in Manhattan. His career path 180 began with his decision to enroll in ICE’s Culinary Arts program, where he began with zero professional kitchen experience and ended with a paid position at one of the best restaurants in the world — Eleven Madison Park. You’d be hard-pressed to find a better example of regeneration. And Greg continues to grow and make waves with his honest cooking and cheeky presentations of serious food.

Greg Proechel

Culinary school may have seemed an unlikely destination for a Wesleyan graduate who majored in economics. But to Greg, it was clear that a desk job wasn’t for him. “I need to do stuff with my hands. I always have,” says Greg. “I was a very avid drawer and I was always building stuff. I think I built every piece of furniture in my parents’ house. I knew I’d have to do something tactile.” So, college athlete, artist, carpenter — when did cooking enter the picture? “Cooking was always a big part of my life. All memories of my family revolve around food,” explains Greg. “I really wanted to go to culinary school as soon as I graduated.” To appease his parents, however, Greg worked as an analyst for a couple of years after college, all the while planning his next move. “I kept researching culinary programs, and when I got home from work, I’d practice my kitchen skills.” In 2009, just after ICE won its second IACP award, Greg applied to ICE’s Culinary Arts program — his first turn toward the professional life he truly wanted.

As the restaurant’s website will tell you, “Ferris is an amalgamation of everything Proechel has done in his New York restaurant career.” Greg laid the foundation for that career with his first externship during culinary school. Acting on the advice of ICE Chef Ted Siegel, Greg applied for an externship at Eleven Madison Park, which had just received its four-star rating from the Times. Despite the steep learning curve and inevitable slip-ups out of the gate, the learning experience was well worth it. “In the beginning, I messed up every single day,” says Greg, “but towards the end, I started doing well. And then I was hired.” It was during this time that Greg learned not necessarily what to cook, but how to work. Explains Greg, “To this day, I still use the methods I learned from my sous chef at EMP.” With the methods of a well-oiled Michelin-star machine under his belt, Greg was ready to start innovating in the kitchen.

Ferris Cote de Boeuf

Ferris’ Cote de Boeuf with all the fixings (photo courtesy of Ferris)

Ferris Cote de Boeuf

From Eleven Madison Park, Greg went on to Graffit, a modern Spanish restaurant led by Chef Jesus Nuñez, where he delved into molecular gastronomy. For a fledgling chef in the heyday of El Bulli, it was an exciting place to be. It was also the first place where Greg was given free reign to experiment in the kitchen. “That’s why I picked this career,” says Greg, “because you get to express yourself through food — and that was the first chance I got to do that all the time.” Four months into his stint at Graffit, Greg joined Chef Nuñez on Iron Chef, where they went head to head with Chef Michael Symon in the octopus battle. “That was just 16 months into my cooking career, so it was insane,” says Greg, “but the chef really believed in me.” Then, with a reinforced sense of kitchen creativity and confidence, Greg joined the team at Blanca, the pioneer of extravagant tasting menus in the then up-and-coming Bushwick neighborhood of Brooklyn. Working alongside chef-owner Carlo Mirarchi, Greg found a warm welcome for his values, like carefully chosen, immaculately prepared products, and his inventive cooking. Together, these experiences prepared him for his ascent to executive chef at Le Turtle, where Greg created a menu of food described as “regularly excellent and at the very worst, interesting,” and set the restaurant world abuzz with his Sasso chicken — the chicken — served in its glorious, crispy skin entirety on a bed of hay. Advancing with a seemingly blind sense of determination, the young chef was already making a name for himself in New York City.

Once the world caught wind that Greg was taking the helm of a new restaurant venture, Ferris, diners eagerly awaited what promised to be a bold menu. Judging by reviews, he has delivered on that promise, with “insistently innovative dishes” emerging from the tiny, five-person kitchen. Greg seems to have taken no small amount of pleasure in channeling his experience and his favorite things into every item on the menu. Take, for example, the cote de boeuf served with “all the fixings” — various iterations of the onion — inspired in part by Eastbound & Down (Danny McBride fans will recall his character’s affinity for feeeexins), and also a nod to the standard procession of plates that come with any meal in nearby Koreatown. “When I go to Miss Korea in K-Town, they bring all of these different plates and sauces — that’s how I love to eat.” In other dishes, like the infamous roasted Sasso chicken, which isn’t on the menu but is served based on availability, you’ll find Greg’s childhood memories of farms in New Jersey, his home state, and his grandparents’ farm in Vermont. In terms of the theatrical element to Greg’s cooking, like the cote de boeuf presentation that brings the entire dining room to a hush as fellow diners look on enviously, it’s impossible to ignore the wink to the restaurant that wrote the book on theatrical dining — Eleven Madison Park.

Asked about the restaurant’s name, Ferris, Greg says it doesn’t have one origin, but rather, evokes a certain kind of feeling: the excitement of a kid on a Ferris wheel; the joie de vivre of the protagonist of “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off.” Greg, no doubt, is excited about food, and that excitement is contagious in his small, subterranean dining room. There’s also the idea of coming full circle, like a Ferris wheel, as Greg has done — from the days of being an analyst with a pipe dream of breaking into the culinary industry to today, an octopus-tatted chef who’s creating delicious dishes that are a joy to eat. It’s a story of hard work, tenacity and regeneration, and it began with a decision to change his life’s course. As the precocious Ferris Bueller once said — Life moves pretty fast. If you don’t stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it. Greg isn’t missing it.

Ready to find your culinary voice? Learn more about ICE’s career programs. 

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By Danielle Page

“There is a comfort and safety of being behind the scenes,” ICE graduate Adrienne Cheatham said in a video interview with The New York Times.

Adrienne Cheatham

photo courtesy of Bravo

But on this season of Top Chef, Cheatham steps into the spotlight to compete for a chance to win — presenting her dishes to be judged by renowned chefs including James Beard award winner Lachlan Mackinnon-Patterson, celebrity chef Curtis Stone and most recently, three-Michelin-star chef David Kinch.

It’s no surprise to see an ICE alum competing on this popular show — past seasons have included ICE graduates Arnold Myint and Ashley Merriman, and ICE alum Gail Simmons lends her expertise as a judge.

Not only is Cheatham an ICE graduate, she also spent time as an ICE chef-instructor, sharing knowledge she gained while moving up the ranks at three-Michelin-star restaurant Le Bernardin, where she served as executive sous chef. After spending eight years at the restaurant, Cheatham joined chef Marcus Samuelsson at Red Rooster, where she eventually became executive chef. Recently, she left this role to pursue opening a restaurant of her own.

“There’s always something that happens that gets in the way of being creative,” Cheatham told the Times, in reference to working in someone else’s kitchen. On this season of Top Chef, however, lack of creativity has been no challenge for her. Take Adrienne’s impressive Quickfire dish in last week’s episode: a beautiful seared scallop carpaccio with watermelon radish, black radish, radish blossoms and yuzu.

Whether she’s on the line or on television, Adrienne’s cooking reflects her unique food perspective. “My [culinary] voice is a reflection of everything about me — not just what I like to eat, but the kind of person I am,” Cheatham told ICE in an interview. “So a dish that I put together is an expression of love, of happiness, of learning. It’s a reflection of all of my life experiences that have created the person I am, and translating that into the food that I create.”

Currently, Cheatham is still in the running with five other chefs to beat. Tune in to Bravo Thursday nights at 10 p.m. EST to watch Cheatham compete to win the title of Top Chef.

Click here to learn about ICE’s career programs.

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By Caitlin Raux

In a city like New York, where restaurants are as abundant as rents are high, getting diners in the restaurant door is only one side of the coin. The other side, getting return customers, presents another set of challenges. At Villanelle, a veggie-forward newcomer to the Greenwich Village restaurant scene, first-time restaurant owner Catherine Manning (Culinary Management ’15) has found a balance between casual elegance and exceptional food, and the result is a steadily growing roster of regulars. With dishes like crispy octopus with charred cucumber, green curry and mint, the food is tasty, fresh and feel-good. While there are plenty of delicious reasons to overdo it, chances are you won’t leave feeling like you did. It’s all part of Catherine’s goal of providing great, highly repeatable dining experiences.

Catherine Manning

Catherine Manning, owner of Villanelle

Villanelle

The restaurant’s name, Villanelle, comes from the eponymous 16th century Italian poem, traditionally performed by song and dance. The name captures Catherine’s spirit of hospitality as a form of entertainment. To dine at Villanelle is to experience a series of pleasant surprises. From the moment you walk in from East 12th Street, just two blocks from the bustle of Union Square, you find a surprisingly charming yet laid back space that looks less curated than it is. From the bare, wood tables and the grey-washed pine walls to the pristine marble-top bar (that seems perfect for Instagram’ing their gourmet cocktails), it’s the kind of setting that invites you to cozy up and stay a while.

Villanelle’s true entertainment, however, comes from the kitchen. The chefs take simple ingredients and prepare them with impeccable techniques and unique flavor pairings — like the macerated brussels sprouts with cheddar, cashews and rye. “I like taking familiar dishes and reworking them so people feel excited. It’s familiar food, but when you see it, it’s not what you expect,” explained Villanelle’s sous chef Christian Grindrod, an alumnus of ICE’s Culinary Arts program (’16) and the critically-acclaimed, recently closed Betony. “Then you bite into it, and it’s exactly what you wanted.” Take, for example, the composed cheese dish: what appears to be a sweet slice of pumpkin pie with a tuft of whipped cream is actually a savory slice of squash topped with tangy cloumage cheese — a trick of the eye and a delight for the palate.

Catherine Manning

Christian Grindrod

Christian Grindrod, sous chef and ICE alum

Perhaps coincidentally, before Villanelle, Catherine led a successful career as a producer of visual effects and animation for commercial projects. “In a way, running a restaurant isn’t that different because it’s still production,” said Catherine. “You’re making food instead of TV commercials, but you have crews, schedules and budgets. The skill sets match.” With four daughters and a frequently full dinner table, she and her husband spent years as hobby cooks who loved entertaining. “Those were some of our happiest times,” Catherine recalled. “And an important reason why I did this — hospitality, a good meal and the conversation that ensues while having a good meal.” At some point, it occurred to Catherine that she might like having her own restaurant some day. When Catherine decided it was time for a career change, she enrolled in ICE’s Restaurant & Culinary Management program.

The menu at Villanelle holds true to the farm-to-table claim. Most of their entrées feature thoughtfully chosen meats like Berkshire Pork Loin and Green Circle Chicken, and with the Union Square Greenmarket a short stroll uptown, chefs frequently pop by the market to hand-pick the season’s best produce. Despite the ubiquity of the term, staying farm-to-table can be trickier than it seems. Chef Christian enjoys the challenge. “It’s all about anticipating what’s going to be good this season and working on recipes for those ingredients. When they become scarce, you have to be quick on your feet and change it up,” Christian explained. “That’s part of the fun of working here.” For her part, Catherine mapped out the business side of owning a farm-to-table restaurant during her time at ICE. “The business plan component [of the Restaurant & Culinary Management program] was really helpful for me — to go through the entire process and put together projections,” explained Catherine. “It helped me crystallize what it was I had in mind.

After developing her restaurant concept with the help of ICE’s expert food business instructors, Catherine was as prepared as possible for opening her first restaurant. Still, her status as rookie lends the restaurant a sort of start-up vibe, for better or worse. What they lack in experience, they make up for with energy and ambition: staff are motivated to work harder because they know their contribution makes a difference; communication is paramount; voices are heard. “None of us have been fully responsible for opening a restaurant before,” said Catherine. “We’re all on the same team. It’s exciting to build a business and everyone feels that.”

With a write-up in the NY Times and glowing customer reviews, Catherine and Villanelle are already making waves downtown. “We’re still figuring things out as we go, but I think our customers are pleased with what we’ve done so far.” Jumping head first into NYC restaurant ownership may have been a bold move, but with her preparation and a passion for hospitality, Catherine is successfully navigating the transition. On a personal level, Catherine is enjoying her new career in the restaurant industry. “What’s not to like about bringing something that makes people happy into existence? If you serve people a great meal and they have a great experience, that’s a great business to be in.”

Learn more about ICE’s Restaurant & Culinary Management program. 

 

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By Caitlin Raux

Gail Simmons knows great food. The Top Chef judge (for 15 seasons and counting!) and ICE Culinary Arts graduate has a taste for adventurous eating and the passport mileage to prove it. But what does she cook when she’s in her own kitchen? Which recipes does Gail rely on again and again when she’s on her home turf? Readers will discover Gail’s time-tested and totally doable favorites in her new cookbook, Bringing it Home: Favorite Recipes from a Life of Adventurous Eating. We couldn’t think of a better gift to give the food lover in your life. But still, we were curious — what is the Toronto-native gifting the people on her list? As it turns out, food isn’t the only thing Gail knows well — check out her great gift recommendations. 

Gail Simmons

Photo by Johnny Miller

For the kitchen gadget whiz: Joule by ChefSteps

I’m not a big gadget person — I’m more a basic tool person — but one thing in the gadget category that I have totally fallen in love with is the Joule. It’s a really sleek, tiny immersion circulator tool. You can clip it on the side of any pot, set the app on your phone to the exact degree that you want to cook and sous vide almost anything. It is so easy and amazing. I used to scoff at the idea of a sous vide machine for the home cook and how modern chefs are so crazy for them, but I found so many great uses for the sous vide. It’s also a great way to cook with kids because they can’t burn themselves and it is easy to understand and use with them. I have made everything from poached lobster, steak and chicken to crème brulée with the Joule.

For the ace baker: Supernatural Kitchen Baking Products

Right now I am really obsessed with a new line of all-natural baking products just launched by Supernatural, a company created by a friend of mine. They make coconut sugar, which I love and use in all of my baking. Don’t get me wrong — it’s still sugar, but it has a lower glycemic index than regular refined sugar and I love the flavor. The other product that I recommend for bakers is Supernatural’s line of natural, plant-derived food coloring. They are vibrant, gorgeous, amazing colors and there is nothing bad in them; there are no artificial colors or preservatives. They have this amazing color called Magic Blackberry, which is a really deep blue. It can become almost black, but you can also adjust the amount so it becomes pinkish. It is great for baking with kids, obviously, because it is all natural, but they also do sprinkles and sequins in all natural colors, star confetti [“starfetti”] and rainbow sprinkles.

For the curator of beautiful things: Ceramic Pitcher (That Doubles as a Vase)

I love beautiful ceramics that are functional — like a beautiful ceramic pitcher that can also be used as a vase, so it is very multi-purpose.

For the host(ess) with the most(ess): Marble and Copper Monogram Boards

For friends who are entertainers, I would get a beautiful marble slab from Williams Sonoma. Their version has a copper monogram on it, so it’s a nice personalization. It’s also great for taking pictures of your food on.

The cookbook collector: Bringing It Home: Favorite Recipes from a Life of Adventurous Eating by Gail Simmons

So my book, I think it’s the best possible gift. I worked really hard on it. It was two years in the making but really a lifetime. It has recipes that are meant for the real home cook. It has recipes that I actually cook all the time, for all levels of cooks. There are some ambitious recipes, but there are also a lot of simply delicious dishes that anyone could make — that’s what I look for in a cookbook. There are over a hundred recipes that I have created and developed from my lifetime of traveling the world and cooking with some of the greatest chefs. It was a real labor of love.

It’s also perfect for the holiday season: there’s a whole chapter in the book called “Party Time,” which is all snacks and food that I love serving when I have people over, but not for a seated meal. I do different dips like muhammara, a Syrian-inspired dip with roasted red peppers, walnuts and pomegranates. Then there’s a great basic hummus that I serve with preserved lemon and fennel seed. In that same chapter, I have amazing fried pickles and crispy baked chickpeas. Or my latke Reubens, which is what I will be serving for Hanukkah this year. I used my mom’s latke recipe and then I make a great play on Russian dressing with spicy sour cream and I serve it with pastrami slices and a really fresh, bright apple-celery slaw on top.

For the in-law who you will impress this year: Food-Inspired Jewelry from Delicacies

I try to get my in-laws something that they wouldn’t necessarily get themselves. My father-in-law is tricky, but he’s a sports guy so hockey tickets are what I generally go with. Hockey tickets or a really nice pair of gloves. For my mother-in-law, there is this jewelry company called Delicacies that makes elegant, food-inspired jewelry, and gives a portion of their proceeds to hunger-related charities; until the end of this year, they are donating a portion of the proceeds from all purchases to City Harvest. They make these beautiful, diamond-encrusted eggs that are pendants for necklaces or bracelets, or they have gold and silver eggs, too. I love the egg because it’s a beautiful symbol for its shape and it’s symbolic of fertility and renewal and the New Year. They also do a line of pasta-related jewelry, which are really fun. I have a farfalle necklace that I wear all the time — that would be perfect to give my mother-in-law.

Wildcard: Essrum Egg Cups

Speaking of eggs — because I love an egg and I think they are a fun gift to get people: little egg cups. I collect egg cups and not a lot of people own them. I have a great recipe in my book for soft-boiled eggs with buttery soldiers that I serve with two different kinds of butters — these egg cups could be great for that.

Interested in learning where a Culinary Arts diploma can take you? Learn more about ICE’s career program.


Looking for the ultimate gift for the food lover in your life? Try a gift card for a cooking, baking, wine or mixology course at ICE. From homemade pasta and creative macarons to Tuscan wines and New Orleans–style cocktails, there are so many courses to choose from. Even better: when you buy a gift card, you’ll get a gift card worth a 20% discount. Then maybe you and your loved one can make something delicious together. 

To redeem this offer, enter the code ICEHOLIDAY17 during checkout.

This promotion is available beginning at 12am on December 15th and ending at 11:59pm on December 26th. This code is not valid for previous orders and cannot be combined with gift card orders.

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